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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone use a trolley jack to raise the front of the bike when doing work on the steering stem / forks etc?

I'm concerned the sump is too far back and the uneven weight distribution will make the bike very unstable.

Your thoughts?
 

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Back on two wheels!
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If you put it on a rear stand and slowly lift at the sump you will be fine.

Put a block of wood between the jack and the sump.

I have spools on mine and I had to watch the stand because as I lifted in the front it was far enough back that the back was also lifting a little and the spools were losing contact with the stand. So you are limited to how much you can lift at the sump.

hope that helps.

just be careful doing it.
 

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it's better to hang the bike from the rafters than jack at the oilpan... the bike is VERY front heavy and will just try to tip off the stand all the time.
 

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It can be done, but use something as large as possible to spread pressure out throughout the pan, and not crack it. In a pinch.......Uh-Kay. Habitually........not a good idea. ;)
 

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I've done that, but I have a huge floor jack with a big flat area, and I've been careful to line up a wooden block to make it support the bike laterally. We got the bike up like that in a friend's garage and it tried to fall over a few times, so be very careful. Steering stem stand or hang it off the ceiling beam on a tie-down is a much better option IMHO.
 

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It's not worth trying. I did this the first time I changed a front tire on my bike (didn't have a front stand yet). I had to zip tie the rear stand to the spools because the bike wanted to keep tipping. It was a really nervous half hour. A T-Rex front stand is about $60 on e-bay, is a pretty good copy of a Pit-Bull and well worth the money. DON'T OPERATE WITHOUT PROPER STANDS, it's just not worth the cost of a tipover in the garage
 

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Back on two wheels!
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well all I needed to do this for was to space the shock. so I just lifted enough to get the shock to lift a tad.

a good front stand is always the best option.;)
 

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man, u guys are worried over the smallest things. the oil pan wont crack as long as one wheel is on the ground distributing the weight. if both wheels are off the ground and ALL the weight of the bike is on that pan, maybe then it MIGHT give.

as far as the bike tipping forward, i did mine and well it started going forward, so i used some tiedowns and hooked the subframe to the lift. it kept the back attached to the rearstand and also kept the bike from moving sideways.

ya mickeymouse jobs are a big no no, but sometimes you got to make use of what you have. just make sure to look over everything and not overlook the "what if's". goodluck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cheers for the replies.

I have a front stand, but it goes on the forks rather than under the headstock.

I want to raise the front to check the steering, so need the forks to be free to move.

Sadly I don't have any beams to hang a winch from and lift the front from above, so a jack under the sump seemed the next option.
 

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chimp on my shoulder
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you'll be fine just be carefull where you place it. try to go as far forward as you can. I do it all the time when I wash the bike to clean the front wheel. and don't try to go to high with it or it might tip. an inch or two is pretty sturdy.
 

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Cheers for the replies.

I have a front stand, but it goes on the forks rather than under the headstock.

I want to raise the front to check the steering, so need the forks to be free to move.

Sadly I don't have any beams to hang a winch from and lift the front from above, so a jack under the sump seemed the next option.
Buy an Abba stand. Used mine today to replace the steering head bearings - 1 hour 20mins start to finish which I dont think is bad.
Abba stand on the swing arm pivot & jack under the sump. Solid & much more stable than a paddock stand.
Nick
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Buy an Abba stand. Used mine today to replace the steering head bearings - 1 hour 20mins start to finish which I dont think is bad.
Abba stand on the swing arm pivot & jack under the sump. Solid & much more stable than a paddock stand.
Nick
Yeah, I've got an Abba stand but was concerned about the jack under the sump bit.

Good to hear others have no problems.

Funnily enough it's checking someone else's work on the head bearings which I need to do. Got a local workshop to do it and recently found the steering bearing adjustment nut to be finger tight.

Maybe they got it confused with the lock nut, or just didn't have the correct tool so didn't bother :mad:
 

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Yeah, I've got an Abba stand but was concerned about the jack under the sump bit.

Good to hear others have no problems.

Funnily enough it's checking someone else's work on the head bearings which I need to do. Got a local workshop to do it and recently found the steering bearing adjustment nut to be finger tight.

Maybe they got it confused with the lock nut, or just didn't have the correct tool so didn't bother :mad:
It is quite difficult to get them just right without the proper honda peg spanner to allow use of a torque wrench & they will loosen slightly if the bearing cups are not totally seated. I usually tighten them right up to centre the bearing & then back the nut off until the steering moves easily. You need 2 c-spanners at the very least to lock the second nut up.
Youll soon know if they are too loose as they will click on heavy braking - better than too tight. Just repeat until youre happy

Nick
 

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Discussion Starter #16
It is quite difficult to get them just right without the proper honda peg spanner to allow use of a torque wrench & they will loosen slightly if the bearing cups are not totally seated. I usually tighten them right up to centre the bearing & then back the nut off until the steering moves easily. You need 2 c-spanners at the very least to lock the second nut up.
Youll soon know if they are too loose as they will click on heavy braking - better than too tight. Just repeat until youre happy

Nick
Cheers for the tip.

I've got the correct tool from Honda so just did it parrot fashion as they say in the shop manual - 32Nm on the adjustment nut, finger tight on the lock nut, 103Nm on the steering stem nut.

Put it on the jack earlier today and they certainly feel fine. No movement back to front on the forks, and feels smooth from side to side.

Can't deny that it takes a bit of force for initial movement, though. Might try the spring scale thing to see just how much force is needed.

Too tight is bad you say - will it damage the bearings, then?
 
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