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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
O.K. so those nights are getting colder and I have water in my radiators.. So what is the recomended winterizing procedure for an RC51? can I leave nothing in there or should I swap back to anti-freeze which will take 7 flushes to get out again next year? also anything else I should be aware of TIA
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The wife may be a little upset to find one of her cats skinned the first time it hacks up a furball on the seat of the RC... No Go on the living room park job... besides where would I put the Ironing board:woot:
 

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Silver and Black Attack!
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http://www.ahm-ownerlink.com/Maintenance/maint_storing.asp

copied from the Honda Owner's link page:

__________________________________________

STORING YOUR HONDA
We all wish we could ride our motorcycle all year long. But sometimes we have to put it away for a while.

Winter storage may be an unpleasant task, but it's necessary to do it right if you want your Honda ready to ride on that first clear day next spring. Whether you're hibernating for the winter or jetting off for a two-month Caribbean cruise, spending some time now can save hours of frustration in the spring.

Here are some tips for storing your Honda until it's time to ride again. You'll need the proper tools, your service and owner's manuals, and of course, the expertise required to do it. If you're short on time, don't worry. We've also provided some information on alternatives to doing it yourself.

Choosing a storage location

You'll need a place that is dry, out of the weather and out of the way.

Remember that once you've prepped the motorcycle , you don't want to move it any more than you have to. Also keep in mind that you may need to check it periodically, so don't "bury" it in the back of the garage under a pile of storage cartons and lawn furniture.

If at all possible, choose a location away from windows. The ultraviolet rays from sunlight can fade paint and plastic parts. Open sunlight can raise the ambient temperature of the storage area, so it's a good idea to cover plain glass windows with some sort of opaque material.


Protective covers
Wherever you store your Honda for the winter, it's a good idea to cover it with a specially designed cover. There are several reasons for using a special cover as opposed to an old sheet or tarp:A tarp is designed to prevent moisture from getting from one place to another; this means although moisture can't get in, it can't get out either. Moisture trapped under the tarp will condense on your motorcycle as the temperature drops, which can lead to rust.Plain cotton sheeting doesn't trap moisture like the tarp does, but it can absorb moisture and hold it against metal surfaces, causing rust. Also, damp fabric is a great breeding place for mildew, which can damage materials like seat covers.Your Honda dealer offers a complete line of Hondaline® covers and is sure to have one to fit your machine. These special covers are made from a mildew-resistant material, and are vented to allow moisture to escape before it can cause rust.

Preparing your vehicle
Following are the basic steps you'll need to take to prep your Honda for storage. Refer to your Owner's Manual or ask your dealer for detailed step-by-step instructions.Drain the oil and add fresh oil.Prepare the fuel tank and drain the carburetor(s).Lubricate the cylindersRemove the battery and store it where it can be charged at least every two weeks.Service the hydraulic brake and clutch systems.Service the cooling system.Clean, dry, and polish all surfaces.

Now you're ready to cover it up and wait for spring thaw!

Bringing it back
When the weather turns back from lion to lamb, it can mean only one thing - it's spring, and time for a ride on your Honda! If you've faithfully followed our guidelines, you're practically there already.

After you pull off the cover, there are a few things that you should check before you go for your first ride of the season:Check the tires for cracks or splits on the sidewalls. Normal "weather checking" shouldn't be a concern, but if you see large cracks or splits, see your Honda dealer about replacement tires. If the tires look OK, make sure the air pressure is at the recommended level (see your Owner's Manual).Check metal parts for possible rust, and remove it with Pro Honda Spray Cleaner and Polish.Check the drive chain and lube it (if applicable) with Pro Honda Chain LubeCheck final drive oil level (if applicable) and add Pro Honda Shaft Drive Oil if needed. See your Owner's Manual for instructions.Check and fill coolant (if applicable).Install and secure the battery. Coat the terminals with a little clean grease to protect the terminals from corrosion.Give the motorcycle a good cleaning from head to toe.Then just perform your standard pre-ride check (see your Owner's Manual), and you're ready to ride!

Alternatives to doing it yourself
You've read through the storage tips, but maybe you're not the do-it-yourself type. Maybe you're thinking it looks like an awful lot of work, or you just don't have the time. Don't despair - there's always an easier way.

Ask your local Honda dealer if he offers a winter storage service. This is an ideal setup if you want to save time and avoid the hassle of doing it yourself. If your dealer doesn't offer this service, he probably knows someone who does.

Subscribing to a winter storage service usually means taking your motorcycle to the dealer (some dealers will even pick it up). They will prep and store it. All you have to do is give them a call next spring and they'll have it ready for pickup (or deliver it to your door, as the case may be).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
EvilTwin-05 said:
I hope thats distilled water in those radiators. Plus anti freeze is the lubricant for the water pump.
distilled water and water wetter for the pump lube.....
 

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Wild Child said:
copied from the Honda Owner's link page:

__________________________________________

STORING YOUR HONDA
We all wish we could ride our motorcycle all year long. But sometimes we have to put it away for a while.

Winter storage may be an unpleasant task, but it's necessary to do it right if you want your Honda ready to ride on that first clear day next spring. Whether you're hibernating for the winter or jetting off for a two-month Caribbean cruise, spending some time now can save hours of frustration in the spring.

Here are some tips for storing your Honda until it's time to ride again. You'll need the proper tools, your service and owner's manuals, and of course, the expertise required to do it. If you're short on time, don't worry. We've also provided some information on alternatives to doing it yourself.

Choosing a storage location

You'll need a place that is dry, out of the weather and out of the way.

Remember that once you've prepped the motorcycle , you don't want to move it any more than you have to. Also keep in mind that you may need to check it periodically, so don't "bury" it in the back of the garage under a pile of storage cartons and lawn furniture.

If at all possible, choose a location away from windows. The ultraviolet rays from sunlight can fade paint and plastic parts. Open sunlight can raise the ambient temperature of the storage area, so it's a good idea to cover plain glass windows with some sort of opaque material.


Protective covers
Wherever you store your Honda for the winter, it's a good idea to cover it with a specially designed cover. There are several reasons for using a special cover as opposed to an old sheet or tarp:A tarp is designed to prevent moisture from getting from one place to another; this means although moisture can't get in, it can't get out either. Moisture trapped under the tarp will condense on your motorcycle as the temperature drops, which can lead to rust.Plain cotton sheeting doesn't trap moisture like the tarp does, but it can absorb moisture and hold it against metal surfaces, causing rust. Also, damp fabric is a great breeding place for mildew, which can damage materials like seat covers.Your Honda dealer offers a complete line of Hondaline® covers and is sure to have one to fit your machine. These special covers are made from a mildew-resistant material, and are vented to allow moisture to escape before it can cause rust.

Preparing your vehicle
Following are the basic steps you'll need to take to prep your Honda for storage. Refer to your Owner's Manual or ask your dealer for detailed step-by-step instructions.Drain the oil and add fresh oil.Prepare the fuel tank and drain the carburetor(s).Lubricate the cylindersRemove the battery and store it where it can be charged at least every two weeks.Service the hydraulic brake and clutch systems.Service the cooling system.Clean, dry, and polish all surfaces.

Now you're ready to cover it up and wait for spring thaw!

Bringing it back
When the weather turns back from lion to lamb, it can mean only one thing - it's spring, and time for a ride on your Honda! If you've faithfully followed our guidelines, you're practically there already.

After you pull off the cover, there are a few things that you should check before you go for your first ride of the season:Check the tires for cracks or splits on the sidewalls. Normal "weather checking" shouldn't be a concern, but if you see large cracks or splits, see your Honda dealer about replacement tires. If the tires look OK, make sure the air pressure is at the recommended level (see your Owner's Manual).Check metal parts for possible rust, and remove it with Pro Honda Spray Cleaner and Polish.Check the drive chain and lube it (if applicable) with Pro Honda Chain LubeCheck final drive oil level (if applicable) and add Pro Honda Shaft Drive Oil if needed. See your Owner's Manual for instructions.Check and fill coolant (if applicable).Install and secure the battery. Coat the terminals with a little clean grease to protect the terminals from corrosion.Give the motorcycle a good cleaning from head to toe.Then just perform your standard pre-ride check (see your Owner's Manual), and you're ready to ride!

Alternatives to doing it yourself
You've read through the storage tips, but maybe you're not the do-it-yourself type. Maybe you're thinking it looks like an awful lot of work, or you just don't have the time. Don't despair - there's always an easier way.

Ask your local Honda dealer if he offers a winter storage service. This is an ideal setup if you want to save time and avoid the hassle of doing it yourself. If your dealer doesn't offer this service, he probably knows someone who does.

Subscribing to a winter storage service usually means taking your motorcycle to the dealer (some dealers will even pick it up). They will prep and store it. All you have to do is give them a call next spring and they'll have it ready for pickup (or deliver it to your door, as the case may be).
:wtf storage,winter,stop riding???????? 50/50 on the mix,get some cold weather gear!!!!!! www.gerbing.com
 

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Winterizing, to me, means putting on new tires.
 

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I would go with the anti freeze. I had a couple of 30 degree days last year that I was itching to get out and did.



Bruce
 

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stupid question but im gonna ask anyway. What comes in it from the dealer/factory? Also, how much of that stabil stuff do you add to a full tank to do the job? My local dealer tryed telling me that if I leave gas in the tank over the winter...even if i stabilize it...it will be "bad" by the spring and if I run it through I will damage the piston rings and destroy the plugs! Help a craka out!
 

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I follow the maintenance intervals for the bike. Winter comes and goes when it does. Basically remove key from ignition in late fall, insert key and go riding when you see the first chipmunks out running around.
 

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