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Hey all, I just bought a new (to me) 2005 hayabusa last night. The original owner had some kind of suspension work up front because he rode a lot at Deal's Gap. The bike has 20,000 miles and I'm not sure when the work was done but I see residue after riding or pumping the suspension. One guy I called at a local shop said that if they have thicker oil I'll see more residue. Is this the case? What I plan to do is ride to the shop where the work was done and ask the guy face to face but I'd like to hear what you all have to say. Thanks
 

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I don't know...

but i'm about to get my forks serviced too... got a leaky seal after 30k miles... never had them done before and i KNOW it shouldn't have been this long before getting them freshened up... If only i could find a set of Ohlins for Cheap, or Freeeeeeeee!
at any rate, i'm interested in what those who know more than i have to say.
 

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Hayabusa forks may be a bit soft as standard...

Thicker oil isn't necessarily going to improve forks as it will increase the damping (Making them feel harder) when in effect it's making them react slower, not absorbing bumps and rebound being later than the forks were designed for.
Best way to improve fork performance is have them professionally re-sprung & re-valved to suit your riding and match the rear shock at the same time, relative ride heights, etc.

Residue is usually from work fork seals, not thicker oil (Which if anything will be harder to get past good seals than thin oil...). ;)
 

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If you are talking about residue on the sliding portion of the forks you have a leaky fork seal. Pull off the outer dust cover and wipe the seal. Ride a short time and check the seal, it will likely have a drip of fluid on it.

If the forks have never been serviced at 20k miles they should be dismantled, cleaned, and any worn parts replaced (bushings and seals at a minimum I would guess). Inspect the chrome sliders for any hint of nicks or imperfections that would have nicked the seal to start with. Sometimes these can be polished out very carefully with 2000 grit sandpaper, hand rubbed in 45 degree cross-hatch directions between horizontal and vertical.

This would also give you a chance to change springs and install any type of internal upgrade if you want.

These are not difficult things to work on if you have any special tools that are required for your particluar model. You could buy the special tools for what it would cost to have them done at a shop.

BTW, the used fork oil will likely be black as coal and will stain anything it comes in contact with, so be forewarned.
 
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