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Discussion Starter #1
So much for the mighty V4!

http://motomatters.com/news/2010/07/20/some_are_more_equal_than_others_suzuki_t.html

Jorge Lorenzo's huge engine blow-up during qualifying at the Sachsenring showed the extent to which manufacturers are finding the limits with engine life, but Yamaha's problems are nothing compared to Suzuki's. The Rizla Suzuki riders are heading rapidly towards the end of their allocation of six engines to last the season, with Alvaro Bautista already having taken his 5th engine so far, while Loris Capirossi is nearing that moment very quickly. After just 8 of the 18 races, it is clear that there is no way that Suzuki is going to make it through to the end of the season without taking a penalty.

According to Motorcycle News' Matt Birt, the pressure on Suzuki is about to be eased. MCN is reporting that the manufacturers have agreed to give Suzuki an extra three engines per rider, to ensure they make it to the end of the year without incurring a penalty. To take such a penalty once - starting from pit lane 10 seconds after the rest of the field have started - might have been overlooked, but Suzuki was on schedule to have one of their riders starting from pit lane almost every race from Indianapolis onwards. With an allocation of nine engines instead of six, MotoGP's smallest and least well-funded factory has a chance to make it to Valencia without being forced to use engines outside of the imposed limits.
 

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Panigaliscious
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IMO this is BS and MotoGP should tell Suzuki to either live with the rule or GTFO. IIRC everyone agreed the limited engine rule would save money, none of the manufacturers had this rammed down their throat.

What I think this does is sets a dangerous precedent for when Lorenzo uses all his engines and they allow him to have a few extra. He should have to start from the pit lane with each new engine he has to put in over the maximum of six whether he is leading the championship or not.

Bautista & Capirossi knew they were signing on to a bad team but took the paycheck. They have zero chance at a championship and about the same for a win, so who cares if you finish last from pit lane. Chances are you would finish last anyway.

So Suzuki threatens to leave? Bring in the lawyers with that other thing they agreed to do, participate through 2011. Sue their ass off if they breach contract. For the moment it is important Suzuki participate because the grids are so small, but even if Suzuki left mid-season you likely would have 15 bikes on the grid for the rest of the year.

Change the rule for 2011 that teams must have a replacement rider on the bike the next round. At any rate I expect the 1000cc rule will bring Moto2 teams into the big bikes and they will not have an issue of maintaining a minimum grid number.

Basically tell Suzuki to take a hike if they don't like it. MotoGP will forget about Rizla five minutes after the last truck pulls away from Valencia. The only possible concession I would give, and it would apply to everyone for the rest of the year, is to give Suzuki another engine or two for each rider that could only be used on Friday & Saturday practice. Qualifying sessions and the races have to use the original 6 engines.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Goes to show you what happens when you stick with a outdated motor technology/philosophy.
 

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I'm not sure what sburns is complaining about. From the article it suggests this was always the plan and that it's Honda/Yamaha/Ducati that are allowing Suzuki to run extra engines, not Dorna/MotoGP. Even with the extra engines it's doubtful Suzuki will suddenly be competitive, and MotoGP is still better off with them in the series.
 

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I would like to see Kawasaki, BMW, Triumph Aprilia in MotoGP.
Exactly, and if a hard line had been taken with Suzuki and made them even less competitive it's hard to see how this would have encouraged other factories to get involved. I actually think they should have written it into the rules, maybe something like what they did when Dunlop was exempt from the tire restrictions until they won 2 dry races.
 

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This is typical of Dorna and makes Suzuki look pathetic . They are an old company with a storied racing heritage , and not a new upstart just getting into the game , so this allowance certainly isn't going to motivate them to produce a competitive team . It's just a scheme to keep sponsorship money floating into the fatsoes' pockets . Suddenly I'm reminded of the slovenly FIFA execs in the stands BARELY watching the games at the World Cup .
 

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Panigaliscious
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Warning; Arrogance below...

I'm not sure what sburns is complaining about. From the article it suggests this was always the plan and that it's Honda/Yamaha/Ducati that are allowing Suzuki to run extra engines, not Dorna/MotoGP. Even with the extra engines it's doubtful Suzuki will suddenly be competitive, and MotoGP is still better off with them in the series.
What happens in September when Lorenzo has used all his engines and has to start three of the last five races from pit lane?

Yamaha uses the precedent set by Suzuki in July to justify getting extra engines.

None of the other manufacturers give a flying **** about Suzuki's participation. None of the private teams want Rizla Suzuki taking points at the back of the grid from their rider. If Suzuki leaves, all their current sponsors are potential financiers for their team. As long as Rossi and the other Aliens stay in MotoGP the value of the series will remain high. Fewer participants means more for each remaining team for potential sponsorship and TV time.

This is serious bidness with millions on the line based on results. All these other teams want an out if they end up chewing through their engines.

Remember this post in two months.
 

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In the end, the rules are always changed by mutual consent with the major players.....so Honda and Yamaha and Ducati will certainly have been OK with the change (albeit probably reluctantly). In some ways, their sponsors would be willing for Suzuki to remain as well, as without significant participation, the whole show loses exposure, publicity, and potential marketing clout and ultimately, sales.

Do I think it's "fair?" No. Suzuki chose their platform and it's been a huge failure for them, specifically when Mladin circulated his Superbike streetbike at the same times as the works MGP V4 POS that Suzuki has, when they did those spec tire tests a couple of years ago...and Suzuki have shown NO progress relative to the Yamaha/Honda/Ducati since then,,,,,actually gone BACKWARDS.

I think the works teams should be restricted to, say, 10 engines a season, and the private teams unlimited, as that may close the gap between the works and private motors, but that defeats the whole purpose of the rule, which is to make MGP cheaper for the underfunded or new teams....
 

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I agree that this is a bullshit decision. Let Suzuki fail. This is, technically speaking, one of the most interesting seasons so far. And make no mistake: the six-engine rule makes the game MUCH MORE expensive. Now the engines must not only produce extreme usable output, but must do it over a much longer life. Does anyone actually believe that engines built to this formula are less expensive?
This sudden generosity to Suzuki is nothing more or less than the most transparent attempt to sidestep the six-engine rule. My guess is that they are all in deep engine trouble and the organizers know it. It probably wouldn't reflect too well on, let's just guess, uh, Yamaha if they jackrabbitted out to a big points lead only to lose because the engines all grenaded, would it? Think Ducati wants to take that blow to their already-stellar reputation for reliability?
Nope, I'm throwing the BS flag here and now.
 
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