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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes i want one too :D.....don't know what the advantage is over the wet clutch set up (maybe easier/quicker access to change the clutch plates) but they do look realy nice .thanks guys for the links....
 

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That gear indicator is huge. I don't see any real advantage, other than a coolness factor. Even the new duc has a wet clutch. It looks like that would be one of the first things to hit in a lowside, and they leave it unprotected too. For what I can only assume is an expensive kit, it should come with something to cover it.
 

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I could not tell if it said it was a slipper or not. I wonder who makes the clutch plates? Replacement cost on the plates could get expensive it they can not be bought here in the states.
 

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RC51 only 4stroke I liked
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1250 Euro or 1620 USD for the kit.....not including shipping.
Just wait a few weeks when the euro is about to collapse and buy it then, before they readjust prices. It may be $2-300 :)

No, seriously, race bikes had dry clutches for decades now, as the finger man above said.
They also don't overheat and fade under hard use, or they do heat but are not affected by heat as much. Dry clutches work with friction so they are more pressure sensitive than wet clutches that are not meant to slip at all. They say the oil molecules work as a binding agent between the metal and organic material. Almost all racing 2stroke GP bikes had them, and the oil in them only lubed the gear box, so I'd say heat is a minor reason for having them. They are also lighter.

Just don't get your boot caught in one!
 

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Just wait a few weeks when the euro is about to collapse and buy it then, before they readjust prices. It may be $2-300 :)

No, seriously, race bikes had dry clutches for decades now, as the finger man above said.
They also don't overheat and fade under hard use, or they do heat but are not affected by heat as much. Dry clutches work with friction so they are more pressure sensitive than wet clutches that are not meant to slip at all. They say the oil molecules work as a binding agent between the metal and organic material. Almost all racing 2stroke GP bikes had them, and the oil in them only lubed the gear box, so I'd say heat is a minor reason for having them. They are also lighter.

Just don't get your boot caught in one!

how awesome would that be? i would actually really like to do this, but the price needs to be a bit better....who knows, maybe i'll just do it at some point down the road. Need to find out what clutch plates it uses to....i would hope they would use something readily available....maybe a Ducati setup?
 

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Just wait a few weeks when the euro is about to collapse and buy it then, before they readjust prices. It may be $2-300 :)

No, seriously, race bikes had dry clutches for decades now, as the finger man above said.
They also don't overheat and fade under hard use, or they do heat but are not affected by heat as much. Dry clutches work with friction so they are more pressure sensitive than wet clutches that are not meant to slip at all. They say the oil molecules work as a binding agent between the metal and organic material. Almost all racing 2stroke GP bikes had them, and the oil in them only lubed the gear box, so I'd say heat is a minor reason for having them. They are also lighter.

Just don't get your boot caught in one!
YEah i did a it more reading up on it, and they say the oil actually soaks up a lot of the energy and therefore lose some power during the transfer. Another big issue is all the small particles coming off from use (dust) contaminates the oil and gets pushed around the rest of the motor. So the dry clutch is actually the cleaner of the two, most effective, and from what i can tell better for the motor as well....but again, i'm no HRC tech.
Wonder why almost all roadbikes are wet setups, especially since cars all dry setups? there must be a reason.

I know a lot of people do not like the sound....i won't lie....i kind of like it combined with the rumble from the twin. sure it sounds like marbles or bearings bouncing around in a coffee can or something falling apart, but somehow i still like it. Just sounds like raw mechanics.
 

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Back in the 70's, I used to work at a Kawasaki shop after school.
They had an H1R factory race bike and it too had a dry clutch.
Back then, they used bronze friction plates with steel drive plates.
If you think Ducati's make a sound, you should've heard this one.

However you could beat on this clutch mercilessly and it would just shrug it it off.
I also believe the CZ dirt bikes back then also used dry clutches also with bronze and steel plates.
Practically indestructible.
 

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Si vis pacem, para bellum
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YEah i did a it more reading up on it, and they say the oil actually soaks up a lot of the energy and therefore lose some power during the transfer. Another big issue is all the small particles coming off from use (dust) contaminates the oil and gets pushed around the rest of the motor. So the dry clutch is actually the cleaner of the two, most effective, and from what i can tell better for the motor as well....but again, i'm no HRC tech.
Wonder why almost all roadbikes are wet setups, especially since cars all dry setups? there must be a reason.

I know a lot of people do not like the sound....i won't lie....i kind of like it combined with the rumble from the twin. sure it sounds like marbles or bearings bouncing around in a coffee can or something falling apart, but somehow i still like it. Just sounds like raw mechanics.
As far as the sound goes, you can always tell when a Ducati is coming down the street, especially at near idle speeds when the clutch noise overpowers the exhaust. I kind of like it myself, but on the Ducatis I've been around and ridden
I worried about other noises being masked by the clutch. Sometimes I thought i was hearing something, but it was nothing but the clutch. Probably just my mind playing tricks on me.
 

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advantages that it has a dry clutch, ie, a lower oil temperature, doesn't contaminate engine oil with clutch dust, more efficient power transfer, and a clutch coupling more Firm and accurate
.....there ya go

My RC30 came with a wet clutch that also has a slipper/limiter as OEM:D
 

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As far as the sound goes, you can always tell when a Ducati is coming down the street, especially at near idle speeds when the clutch noise overpowers the exhaust. I kind of like it myself, but on the Ducatis I've been around and ridden
I worried about other noises being masked by the clutch. Sometimes I thought i was hearing something, but it was nothing but the clutch. Probably just my mind playing tricks on me.
Yeah, i could see that happening quite a bit. The triple in my 675R has me do some double takes every once in awhile, could only imagine what a dry clutch would have me worrying about.
 

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I kind of view this as a mod for someone that just wants to spend money on their bike. If there's 500 HP Hayabusas putting the power down, and 100,000+ mile Goldwings with unopened engines, I'd have to say that the debate over power transfer and oil contamination are minimal. I see the superfluous benefits being outweighed by the drawbacks- cost, parts availability, additional maintenance, more vulnerable in a crash. But hey, if you want to throw money at your bike, go for it. :)
 

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Dr. Carbon
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if you had a closed cover on the clutch and downed the bike at the track the clutch itself would be just as protected as they normally are... also you don'e spill oil everywhere because a crack doesn't matter... just pick it up and chase for first place again :D
 
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