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Hm 2 new adv bikes from Triumph; one for the 800 class and one for the big bore class me thinks.

Good, and unlike Yamaha, they will actually bring their bikes to NA. Nice. More options for me plus I haven't owned a Triumph yet and it was always on my list.

Priced right, and Triumph's usually are, I could bit. Need to see looks and pray it can actually go offroad.
 

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I hope they get serious with the smaller bike as a true ADV type bike (i.e. more off-road bias than the F800GS....lighter, better low-end torque, etc) but I fear they will go the same way as their Tiger, and make a pseudo-offroad trailie that is really intended as a street bike.

If they're serious, then this will be a VERY interesting bike....
 

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I am picking up a 950 GO! anyway next season or this season once one turns up and I planned on buying another new bike next season. 950 prices are low enough to justify another toy. A Triumph has always been in the cards but tbh I expected it to be their next superbike based on the 675. Rumours are it is coming but I may spring for the new Tiger if it really is the real deal.

Alternatively. I wouldn't have problem with a more off-road biased Tiger, more off-road biased than the Vstrom anyway, and a shaft drive at a reasonable price meaning near the vstrom price line.

Problem is I've never owned a Ducati and with rumours of Edwards and Rossi moving there...
 

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I am picking up a 950 GO! anyway next season or this season once one turns up and I planned on buying another new bike next season. 950 prices are low enough to justify another toy. A Triumph has always been in the cards but tbh I expected it to be their next superbike based on the 675. Rumours are it is coming but I may spring for the new Tiger if it really is the real deal.

Alternatively. I wouldn't have problem with a more off-road biased Tiger, more off-road biased than the Vstrom anyway, and a shaft drive at a reasonable price meaning near the vstrom price line.

Problem is I've never owned a Ducati and with rumours of Edwards and Rossi moving there...
Definitely no shaft drive on the Triumph....the teaser videos show chain and sprocket. Some vids show cast wheels (uGGHH!) while others show spoked wheels (yeah!). Let's hope they go the dirt biased stuff.

The Katoom 950 ADV is a GREAT bike to ride. You'll love it. Thirsty, though.
 

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It's a bit OT, but this is what I posted over at ADVRIDER as my "perfect" fantasy Round-The-World ADV bike....with emphasis on reliability, economy, global consumable parts availability, light weight and sturdiness/crashworthiness. I would kill (OK, maim) for this kind of bike...


800cc air-cooled mildly tuned V-twin
Square Bore/Stroke 80mm x 80mm for 804cc [Relatively narrow bore for lower detonation, fuel economy]
75 degree V-angle transverse mount engine [quick & easy access to valves, plugs]
3-valve SOHC screw-type valve adjusters [15 minute roadside valve adjust with screwdriver]
digital fuel injection with closed loop feedback [altitude correction, fuel economy]
knock feedback [runs on any crappy grade fuel]
offset pin (simulated 90 degree) crank with plain bearings [smoothness and longer oil life]
Dry sump with large capacity oil tank in frame with thermostat controlled oil cooler [10K miles OCI, good ground clearance]
large capacity Toyota Landcruiser oil filter [long life and global availability]
Toyota Landcruiser air filter [global availability and high capacity]
6-speed ultra wide-ratio gearbox with crawler 1st and overdrive 6th gears
robust, lightweight shaft drive [no chain/sprocket wear...sand and mud impervious]
Chromoly steel frame and subframe, high-grade bolts. [crashworthy and load capable]
7g central mount plastic fuel tank with fuel level site tube [lightweight, 350 mile range]
Accessible electronics module for easy access to all electronics
large capacity gell battery [shock and spill resistant]
sealed large capacity airbox with high intake behind front fairing [river crossings]
crankcase breather high mount [river crossings]
21" spoked HD alloy tubeless rim front wheel with 90/90x21 TKC80
18" spoked HD alloy tubeless rim rear wheel with 150/70x18 TKC80
Hardwired, removable, global region, glove-friendly IPX7 stereo bluetooth music and radio GPS
High quality adjustable damping cartridge forks with hand-adjust spring preload knobs. 9" travel
High quality rebuildable linkless gas shock with hydraulic remote preload and damping adjust. 8" travel
adjustable height high quality seat with wide rear, narrow front
HD front-rear sliding adjustment luggage rack for solo/dual riders [weight distribution]
HD engine bars [crashworthy]
Adjustable height, angle, width clip-on type handlebars with alu and plastic guards [swivels for crashworthiness]
Twin 55/60 High quality plastic Halogen 7" lamps [good light, lightweight, shatter-proof, bulbs available everywhere]
150W spare electrical capacity for rider heated gearing, gloves, etc
lightweight digital instruments with oil temp, oil pressure,trip computer, volts, amps, dual tripmeters
sealed clutch and throttle cables [water/mud/sand resistant]
Heavy-duty aluminum skid plate with recessed bolts to frame tubes
Custom, waterproof, large capacity tank bag with gas cap offset for quick access
Available accessory soft and hard tail bags and panniers (also with sliding fore/aft frame for solo/dual rider weight distribution]
350lbs fully fueled weight
50 RWHP
US$ 14995
 

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It's a bit OT, but this is what I posted over at ADVRIDER as my "perfect" fantasy Round-The-World ADV bike....with emphasis on reliability, economy, global consumable parts availability, light weight and sturdiness/crashworthiness. I would kill (OK, maim) for this kind of bike...


800cc air-cooled mildly tuned V-twin
Square Bore/Stroke 80mm x 80mm for 804cc [Relatively narrow bore for lower detonation, fuel economy]
75 degree V-angle transverse mount engine [quick & easy access to valves, plugs]
3-valve SOHC screw-type valve adjusters [15 minute roadside valve adjust with screwdriver]
digital fuel injection with closed loop feedback [altitude correction, fuel economy]
knock feedback [runs on any crappy grade fuel]
offset pin (simulated 90 degree) crank with plain bearings [smoothness and longer oil life]
Dry sump with large capacity oil tank in frame with thermostat controlled oil cooler [10K miles OCI, good ground clearance]
large capacity Toyota Landcruiser oil filter [long life and global availability]
Toyota Landcruiser air filter [global availability and high capacity]
6-speed ultra wide-ratio gearbox with crawler 1st and overdrive 6th gears
robust, lightweight shaft drive [no chain/sprocket wear...sand and mud impervious]
Chromoly steel frame and subframe, high-grade bolts. [crashworthy and load capable]
7g central mount plastic fuel tank with fuel level site tube [lightweight, 350 mile range]
Accessible electronics module for easy access to all electronics
large capacity gell battery [shock and spill resistant]
sealed large capacity airbox with high intake behind front fairing [river crossings]
crankcase breather high mount [river crossings]
21" spoked HD alloy tubeless rim front wheel with 90/90x21 TKC80
18" spoked HD alloy tubeless rim rear wheel with 150/70x18 TKC80
Hardwired, removable, global region, glove-friendly IPX7 stereo bluetooth music and radio GPS
High quality adjustable damping cartridge forks with hand-adjust spring preload knobs. 9" travel
High quality rebuildable linkless gas shock with hydraulic remote preload and damping adjust. 8" travel
adjustable height high quality seat with wide rear, narrow front
HD front-rear sliding adjustment luggage rack for solo/dual riders [weight distribution]
HD engine bars [crashworthy]
Adjustable height, angle, width clip-on type handlebars with alu and plastic guards [swivels for crashworthiness]
Twin 55/60 High quality plastic Halogen 7" lamps [good light, lightweight, shatter-proof, bulbs available everywhere]
150W spare electrical capacity for rider heated gearing, gloves, etc
lightweight digital instruments with oil temp, oil pressure,trip computer, volts, amps, dual tripmeters
sealed clutch and throttle cables [water/mud/sand resistant]
Heavy-duty aluminum skid plate with recessed bolts to frame tubes
Custom, waterproof, large capacity tank bag with gas cap offset for quick access
Available accessory soft and hard tail bags and panniers (also with sliding fore/aft frame for solo/dual rider weight distribution]
350lbs fully fueled weight
50 RWHP
US$ 14995
You know, it would be nice if you put some thought into your posts before posting. :cool: You've pretty much got me covered minus the price. I'd want something I can walk away from if necessary if going RTW.

A good friend goes south every few yrs and always takes a 600/650 single, lately a 1st gen BMW F650 for the last 3 yrs. He got hit in Guatemala and had to fly back. But he walked away from a bike with nearly 100,000 miles on it and tons of damage so he left something worth 3-4K if mint down there.

KLR fits the bill imo. :clapper

I'm taking two months off work next yr to do a big trip. I'm heading west then south and plan on hitting places like Ouray, part of the Cont. Divide etc. before heading south. No idea how far south I will get but would like to aim for tip of S.A. I'm leaning more and more towards a single for the trip, KLR of course springs to mind as do others, albeit more exotic models.

Another alternative is to have all the parts sitting at home ready for shipping if needed. Something I plan on doing for my trip with the aid of my friends.

I'm also thinking Husky 610e; yes I know more finicky and more coin and less dealers but oh so cool. I sping for both in the end; even together bother are still 1/2 the price of a new superbike and I'd get more use out of these.
 

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The first generation Transalps were pretty close to those specs and many have been used for adventure tours around the world.
Being a product of the '80s they obviously lacked any electronic sophistication but that was part of the charm: everything could be fixed "on the field".
People on a Trans-Siberian tour run out of brake pads, turned up at a local airfield and a very knowledgeable Russian mechanic cut some friction material from an Antonov airliner brake pads and made new ones in little more than two hours (glue has to dry, you know). :rockon

And don't forget old Honda build quality.
 

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I'm taking two months off work next yr to do a big trip. I'm heading west then south and plan on hitting places like Ouray, part of the Cont. Divide etc. before heading south. No idea how far south I will get but would like to aim for tip of S.A. I'm leaning more and more towards a single for the trip, KLR of course springs to mind as do others, albeit more exotic models.

Another alternative is to have all the parts sitting at home ready for shipping if needed. Something I plan on doing for my trip with the aid of my friends.

I'm also thinking Husky 610e; yes I know more finicky and more coin and less dealers but oh so cool. I sping for both in the end; even together bother are still 1/2 the price of a new superbike and I'd get more use out of these.
Very cool trip, man. Hope you get to do it, and take tons of pics and notes for a RR.

Have you read Sgt Marty's trip to TFG and back on his KLR650? It's an excellent read. He does mention lack of KLR parts in some of the SA countries, but he still managed.

Prudhoe Bay to Ushuaia (scroll to the bottom, left for the links to the pages)
 

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He with the senior member
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The first generation Transalps were pretty close to those specs and many have been used for adventure tours around the world.
Being a product of the '80s they obviously lacked any electronic sophistication but that was part of the charm: everything could be fixed "on the field".
People on a Trans-Siberian tour run out of brake pads, turned up at a local airfield and a very knowledgeable Russian mechanic cut some friction material from an Antonov airliner brake pads and made new ones in little more than two hours (glue has to dry, you know). :rockon

And don't forget old Honda build quality.
Cool story! That's what makes a trip like that even more memorable.
Oh, and yeah, Honda reliability is a big bonus for a RTW trip.

BTW...a friend and myself are also considering the trans-Siberian gig, but not along the highway. We want to do the BAM road, after the Road of Bones. If we can manage the finances, it will be around 2013...and we'll need to learn some Russian and be able to read some Cyrillic, for the road signs. Have you read any of Colebatch's RRs on ADVRIDER....absolutely amazing stuff.

Road of Bones and the Kolyma Highway - Pure Photos - ADVrider
 
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