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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
oriental scientist are making better metals. as usual, humans progress, its all humans know how to do.

the point of the story is really that they hit a point where they need serious backing because they have proven there are ways to make a big step forward, possibly for the entire industry, but havent ironed it all out so to speak. if they can, they can make stronger aluminium commercially available.

better for bikes, airplanes, etc etc.
 

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Panigaliscious
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This is very common with any research group who is pushing the boundaries of engineering and trying to operate as a viable business. Their only real value is the IP, but its value is unclear because it is unproven. Somewhat of a chicken and egg situation.

We worked with a local company that does some defense stuff that is very cool that our tax dollars pay for. They also have some very unique battery patents that would likely revolutionize things like electric bikes if the technology could be made affordable becuase of the high energy density (much more than Lithium or Ni-Cad). Anyway, they approached us and "courted" our technical people for some time before finally asking for what they really wanted: money. Basically they were hoping we could make their payroll for a few months to keep going.

We declined and haven't heard much from them since.
 

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Damn, where's Larry when you need him to 'splain stuff??
Lidz..... U sure you want that?
Splanation would be that the molecule is built on a V4 electron layout with valance in multiples of v to the 4th. Then there's the fuzzy graphics. Then the emotional aspect which justifies it.

Jeez... I'm getting skeered. I better stfu.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Metal Smasher Makes Aluminum as Strong as Steel - ScienceNOW

Snuffing out a cigarette butt with a 10-ton boot would be excessive, but using the equivalent on certain metals can yield amazing results. By smashing an aluminum alloy between two anvils, researchers have created a metal that's as strong as steel but much lighter. If the process can be commercialized, it could yield better components for aircraft and automobiles, as well as metal armor light enough for soldiers to wear in battle.

Aluminum's main advantage is its lightness. But the second-most-abundant metal in Earth's crust is also a weakling: It breaks apart under loads that heavier metals such as steel shoulder easily. For decades, scientists have been looking for a way to manufacture the aluminum equivalent of titanium, a lightweight metal that's stronger than steel, but without titanium's high cost.

In the new study, an international team of materials scientists turned to an emerging metal-processing technique called high-pressure torsion (HPT). Basically, HPT involves clamping a thin disk of metal to a cylindrical anvil and pressing it against another anvil with a force of about 60,000 kilograms per square centimeter, all while turning one anvil slowly. The researchers also kept the processed samples at room temperature for over a month, in a common metallurgical process called natural aging. The deformation under the enormous pressure plus the aging alters the basic structure of metals at the nanoscale—or distances measured in billionths of a meter.

And indeed, when the team subjected an alloy of aluminum called aluminum 7075 (which contains small percentages of magnesium and zinc) to the process, the metal attained a strength of 1 gigapascal, the researchers report in the current issue of Nature Communications. That's equal to some of the strongest steels and more than three times higher than conventional aluminum. A meter-square plate of the processed alloy could withstand the weight of a fully loaded aircraft carrier.

To find out why the alloy had gotten so much stronger, the team examined samples using a technique called atom probe tomography. Resembling a combination of an electron microscope and a CT scanner, the method showed that HPT had deformed the lattice of atoms in the alloy into an unprecedented arrangement. Instead of the normal structure found in the conventional metal, HPT had created what the researchers call a hierarchical nanostructure: the size of the aluminum grains was reduced, and the zinc and magnesium atoms clustered together in groups of various sizes, depending on whether they were located inside the aluminum grains or on the edges (see photo).

Exactly how this arrangement creates stronger aluminum is unclear, says co-author Simon Ringer, director of the Electron Microscope Unit at the University of Sydney in Australia. He says the atoms at the edges of the grains seem to be bonded tightly to atoms at adjoining grain edges. Whatever the physics, he says, the hierarchical structures are "very potent for strengthening."

Ringer adds that even though the experiments produced only laboratory quantities of the superstrength alloy, the process could quickly be adapted to produce small components that require high strength but low weight, such as biomedical implants. Co-author and materials scientist Yuntian Zhu of North Carolina State University in Raleigh says there is strong incentive to scale up the process because the alloy could be useful for "many lightweight, energy-efficient applications such as aerospace, transportation, and body armor."

The experiments "have achieved remarkable strength" in a conventional commercial aluminum alloy, says materials scientist Terence Langdon of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. The research team has also demonstrated "the exceptional capabilities provided through processing by high-pressure torsion," a technique that Langdon and others have been working with for several years.

Materials scientist Yuri Estrin of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, calls the results exciting and agrees that the hierarchical nanostructures "appear to be crucial to the spectacular enhancement of [the alloy's] strength."
 

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A meter-square plate of the processed alloy could withstand the weight of a fully loaded aircraft carrier.
That falls in the believe it when I see it category...just like Republicans will reduce the size of government does.
 
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