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Discussion Starter #1
For discussion sake, let's assume you've found the bike of your dreams and want to keep it forever. The bike's rolling chassis is 100% good and the fuel injected engine only has 15,000 miles. What work other than the
normal maintainence could be expected to keep her running "forever"?
Examples of high mileage bikes's and your experience keeping it going
would be welcome.
 

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Panigaliscious
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First thing you should do is assemble as many special tools and information as you can, preferrably when the bike is newer and there are many sources available.

Many parts in 20 years will also be nearly impossible to find. Case in point is brake rebuild kits for my 851, they simply don't exist and the "crossover" kits also do not work (ask me how I know). So make a list of everything rubber on the bike and buy two of each: seals, grommets, little caps and doodads you don't think about now but will be impossible to find later. Store carefully in a climate-controlled environment.

Bodywork will also be in short supply someday, but likely dirt cheap 2 years from new on Ebay. So buy a set and stick it in your garage loft. Also a good idea to buy a spare used ECU just in case. If you never need any of these things they will be worth a small fortune later on if the bike is a collectible.

Ironically things like camshafts and pistons will be around a long time. Metal sits unchanged for much longer than plastic or rubber will. Custom piston kits can be made (for a substantial fee) if the worst happens.

Definitely get a cover for the bike and use it. Same with front and rear stands. Buy the best chain and sprockets you can find and keep them in top condition, a broken chain will quickly render a bike useless junk. Use a battery tender with an AGM battery. Convert to synthetic oil, ride to your heart's content.
 

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one of my customers has a vfr800 thats done 280,000 miles and so far major work has consisted of a cylinder head gasket and a complete clutch he changes the oil every 4000 miles and has run it on motul 300v since he bought it new.
you should never struggle getting obvious things like C&S kits brakes pads etc its only panel work that id keep in stock for something even down to the ecu there repairable
 

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V4 CyclePath...
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6,827 Posts
I've got over 50K miles on the bike of my dreams that I plan to keep forever and
for every hour of riding I preform about 5 hours of cleaning / maintenance and
mods... I not only want my prize to last but look new as well...

We all agree the most wear that happens in our engines during start up and
before warm up... its because our oil is too thick to properly lubricate our
engines so thats why I warm my engine up to 212º before I select first gear...
only at operating temp of 212º is my synthetic 0-30 Mobil 1 oil at its proper
viscosity of 10...

 

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This space for rent
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1,478 Posts
You should gather every magazine article you can find, start a file with drawings showing why your 15-20 year old bike is superior to the greatest bike on the Grand Prix grid. That way everybody will know when your groundhog day started and senility took over. :woot:
 

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First thing you should do is assemble as many special tools and information as you can, preferrably when the bike is newer and there are many sources available.

Many parts in 20 years will also be nearly impossible to find. Case in point is brake rebuild kits for my 851, they simply don't exist and the "crossover" kits also do not work (ask me how I know). So make a list of everything rubber on the bike and buy two of each: seals, grommets, little caps and doodads you don't think about now but will be impossible to find later. Store carefully in a climate-controlled environment.
If it's not Japanese.
 

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First thing you should do is assemble as many special tools and information as you can, preferrably when the bike is newer and there are many sources available.

Many parts in 20 years will also be nearly impossible to find. Case in point is brake rebuild kits for my 851, they simply don't exist and the "crossover" kits also do not work (ask me how I know). So make a list of everything rubber on the bike and buy two of each: seals, grommets, little caps and doodads you don't think about now but will be impossible to find later. Store carefully in a climate-controlled environment.

Bodywork will also be in short supply someday, but likely dirt cheap 2 years from new on Ebay. So buy a set and stick it in your garage loft. Also a good idea to buy a spare used ECU just in case. If you never need any of these things they will be worth a small fortune later on if the bike is a collectible.

Ironically things like camshafts and pistons will be around a long time. Metal sits unchanged for much longer than plastic or rubber will. Custom piston kits can be made (for a substantial fee) if the worst happens.

Definitely get a cover for the bike and use it. Same with front and rear stands. Buy the best chain and sprockets you can find and keep them in top condition, a broken chain will quickly render a bike useless junk. Use a battery tender with an AGM battery. Convert to synthetic oil, ride to your heart's content.
That's sound advice.
I am currently hoarding bits for my SP2: it will never be a classic but if I find a good deal on, say, a fairing bracket why not? If I'll sell the bike I can always flog it on eBay at the same price and only lose inflation (sigh). I have also bought a good quality road/track body kit, had the original bodywork professionally restored (ie by someone who can apply stickers and touch up paint better than me :eek:) and clear coated and I stored in a good place with no direct sunlight, climate controlled etc. I have also bought a Bagster tank cover to keep all those nasty chips away.
I am currently thinking how to best store my OE wheels which pitifully sit among some cardboard boxes. Suggestions are welcome.
I am always on the lookout for a second hand ECU, CDI etc at a good price. EBay and local classified are good friends.
Of course I have workshop manuals (both US and EU versions) and parts catalog. And i am always scouring places like this for good advice. ;)
 

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I've got over 50K miles on the bike of my dreams that I plan to keep forever and
for every hour of riding I preform about 5 hours of cleaning / maintenance and
mods... I not only want my prize to last but look new as well...

We all agree the most wear that happens in our engines during start up and
before warm up... its because our oil is too thick to properly lubricate our
engines so thats why I warm my engine up to 212º before I select first gear...
only at operating temp of 212º is my synthetic 0-30 Mobil 1 oil at its proper
viscosity of 10...
Waste of time if you ask me. That's why we created multiple viscosity oils. I don't put strait weight in my Duc.
 

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Panigaliscious
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Probably better to let the bike warm up until the temp needle starts to move, then gently ride until up to full temperature. Excessive idling causes other issues, while the coolant might be up to temperature, other parts (like the oil, ironically) might not be up to full temperature yet. Thinking that because the coolant is hot you could pull out of the garage at redline is probably not a good idea.
 

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Excessive idling is terrible for an engine , especially for a highly tuned homo special:rolleyes: , as it can produce elevated head temps and carbon deposits . For warm weather , just warm up for no more than 5 or 6 minutes , then ride gently (below 1/2 of redline) for 10 more minutes .
 

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He with the senior member
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It only takes a few seconds to a maximum of 90 seconds (depending on motor, temp and oil) for the oil to be fully circulating within the motor.
As soon as that occurs, it's best to ride/drive off slowly, keeping throttle and RPM down until the motor is warm. This is the method suggested by virtually every manufacturer as it avoids localized heating and also warms the oil and motor much quicker than sitting idling, reducing condensation, blowby deposits etc that increase before the motor/oil is warm.

Practically, I start the Duc or KLR, and let it idle while putting on my jacket, helmet, gloves, and then ride off. It takes about 5 minutes before the coolant and oil is warm enough to ride normally (not redline stuff yet for another 10 minutes or so)
 

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V4 CyclePath...
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6,827 Posts
Waste of time if you ask me. That's why we created multiple viscosity oils. I don't put strait weight in my Duc.
Even a multiple viscosity oil such as my Mobil 1 synthetic 0 30 is too
thick at 40ºC /104ºF to lubricate your engine properly... your pump
builds pressure but not flow because pressure is inverse proportional
to flow... what is happening instead of lubricating your engine
properly the blow off valve just dumps the excess pressure...

If the Original Posters aim is long life and we agree that the most
wear happens at start up before warm up then based on test done by the
Oil Companies and Independent Test Labs idle your engine until the oil
is at the proper operating viscosity which is 100ºC / 212ºF water
temp... because during idle there is no stress on the critical engine
parts...


Every oil company list viscosity of their oil at 2 temps 40ºC / 104ºF
(room temp) and 100ºC / 212ºF (operating temp) Quote Mobil 1 viscosity
of 0 30 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 56.7

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 10.3


Compare that to the viscosity of straight weight 30

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 97

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 11.7

You can see what the problem with oil is... its too thick at room
temp and just right at operating temps... the lesson that should be learned is
idle the engine up to operating temp of 100ºC / 212ºF before selecting first
gear if you wish to properly lubricate your engine...
 

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2,607 Posts
Don't you think Honda, Yamaha etc and Castrol, Motul etc wouldn't have thought about cold start protection? ;)
Or do we need to light a small fire under the engine oil sump to warm up the oil before use?
 

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Panigaliscious
Joined
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9,103 Posts
Even a multiple viscosity oil such as my Mobil 1 synthetic 0 30 is too
thick at 40ºC /104ºF to lubricate your engine properly... your pump
builds pressure but not flow because pressure is inverse proportional
to flow... what is happening instead of lubricating your engine
properly the blow off valve just dumps the excess pressure...

If the Original Posters aim is long life and we agree that the most
wear happens at start up before warm up then based on test done by the
Oil Companies and Independent Test Labs idle your engine until the oil
is at the proper operating viscosity which is 100ºC / 212ºF water
temp... because during idle there is no stress on the critical engine
parts...


Every oil company list viscosity of their oil at 2 temps 40ºC / 104ºF
(room temp) and 100ºC / 212ºF (operating temp) Quote Mobil 1 viscosity
of 0 30 synthetic oil...

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 56.7

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 10.3


Compare that to the viscosity of straight weight 30

At 40ºC / 104ºF viscosity = 97

At 100ºC / 212ºF viscosity = 11.7

You can see what the problem with oil is... its too thick at room
temp and just right at operating temps... the lesson that should be learned is
idle the engine up to operating temp of 100ºC / 212ºF before selecting first
gear if you wish to properly lubricate your engine...
In your vast library of two-wheeled documents do you happen to have any manufacturer recommendations regarding engine warm up?
 

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V4 CyclePath...
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6,827 Posts
Don't you think Honda, Yamaha etc and Castrol, Motul etc wouldn't have thought about cold start protection? ;)
Or do we need to light a small fire under the engine oil sump to warm up the oil before use?
Oil heaters are common in Alaska because oil companies list minimum pumping
temps for their oils... that is their test of the lowest temperature at which oil is
readily pumpable... do you know the minimum pumping temp of your oil??? my
Mobil 1 0 30 is -50ºC / -121ºF so other than a minus degree day all you need to
do is idle until temps indicate 212ºF if you wish to properly lubricate your prized
engine...
 
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