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Jenias Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Along with the fork service I did a shock service. Once again it should answer most of the questions I see over and over.

This is a service off my race shock which is an Elka. Most shocks are serviced in a similar manner like Ohlins and Penske.

This first trick with the 06-07 R6 is getting the shock out. You have to lift the tank to get at the top shock mount since the top bolts hits the main frame before you can get it completely out. Once you get it out youll have something like this...

This is an Elka triple adjustable.

Tools I used to do this...
Set of allen keys, Pin Spanner, Small pick, Regular screwdriver, Preload collar key, Dead blow hammer, couple of threaded tools, Bearing separator, Spacer blocks. The bearing separator is not normally needed. The lower spring perch on the Elka is just a hair larger then the opening in our spring compressor. A lot of these tools we had to make.


Document your settings..

Spring Length


Rebound


Low Speed Compression


High Speed Compression


Loosen the lock nut on the preload collar


Turn preload down until you can remove the perch on the other end. Penskes have a snap ring holding it on.


On the Elka and the Ohlins with the hydrolic preload you will need a spring compressor. I also needed the bearing separator for the Elka.


Youll end up with a shock, spring and a perch.


Let the gas charge out of the shock.


Push in the cap and remove the snap ring and cap.



Use the pin spanner to remove the seal head from the shock. The Elka and Penskes are threaded and the ohlins taps out.


Next step on an Ohlins would be to remove the inner snap ring but the Elka and Penskes dont have one.

Now you can remove the seal head and valving from the shock body. It can get a bit messy here with oil if youre not careful


Now remove the preload collar. The Elka also has a thrust bearing that was taken off. with the collar.


Now remove the dividing piston from the reservoir.



The shock and all its parts are now ready to be cleaned and dried.



Inspect the valving to make sure its not loose, has broken shims, and or has debris in it.


ASSEMBLY

Apply a little grease to the o-ring of the dividing piston.


Fill the reservoir with oil and put in the dividing piston so there is no air gaps.



Push the dividing piston all the way in. Hold the shock upright so you dont dump the oil all over yourself


Now apply a little grease to the o-ring of the reservior cap, install it and the snap ring.




Now pressurize it with compressed air for the time being.


Apply some never seize to the shock body about where the preload collar will sit.


Install the preload collar, grease the thrust bearing if you have one and install that too.


Fill the shock body with oil. Shouldnt take much since you have already pushed the volume of the reservoir through with the dividing piston.


Now place in the valving and bleed out the air. When you think you have it all bled out give it a good whack on the clevis with the dead blow hammer.


While letting the air out of the reservior push the seal head so there is no air in the system and snug it down.



With the seal head in you can now charge the shock with nitrogen.


The shaft should expand out of the body when pushed in at this point.


Now install the spring.


Return the shock to the setting you recorded.

Preload


Dont forget the lock nut if you have one.


Rebound


Low and High speed compression.



You now have one shock freshened up and ready to be installed back into the bike.
 

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Workaholic
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Yeah, I have a nice tool collection but I had to give up quite a bit when my stuff went into a single car garage. I had to fit my tools, spares, 3 bikes, and my car in there. Let's just say I got very creative with wall mounting.

LOL my kids PowerWheels are mounted on the wall as well!
 

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how do you bleed out the compressed air you used initially? and how many psi of nitrogen go in when finishing up?
 

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When you fill the reservoir and put the IFP in how do control the oil going back into the body? Just let it flow or put a rag in the body?
 

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Very very cool for taking out the time for the write up and pictures:notworthy :notworthy
 

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Jenias Member
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1,510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
how do you bleed out the compressed air you used initially? and how many psi of nitrogen go in when finishing up?
On my shock I just open the valve and compress the shock all the way in. There will be a little air still left but not much. If you want to be anal about it you can use nitrogen the entire time. Its set to 175psi


When you fill the reservoir and put the IFP in how do control the oil going back into the body? Just let it flow or put a rag in the body?
Im not exactly sure what youre asking. What photos are you looking at? Depending on the configuration of the shock, whether its a remote or a piggyback type you need to be a little slick in your movements to avoid spilling oil on the floor.
 

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On my shock I just open the valve and compress the shock all the way in. There will be a little air still left but not much. If you want to be anal about it you can use nitrogen the entire time. Its set to 175psi




Im not exactly sure what youre asking. What photos are you looking at? Depending on the configuration of the shock, whether its a remote or a piggyback type you need to be a little slick in your movements to avoid spilling oil on the floor.
The photo where you are pouring the oil in the resevoir then you put the IFP in. How do you keep the oil from flowing into the body and going on the floor? I would assume you use a rag or something.
 

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Jenias Member
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1,510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The photo where you are pouring the oil in the resevoir then you put the IFP in. How do you keep the oil from flowing into the body and going on the floor? I would assume you use a rag or something.
No rags. The oil doesnt flow all that fast through the valving so you get a few seconds to fill the reservoir and get the dividing piston in. Once youre past the oring on the dividing piston you can tip it upright so the shock body is facing up. Some of the piggyback shocks can be a bit challenging depending how everything is mounted. Everything at our shop is also done over a sink so if a little oil does happen to spill out its not a big deal.
 
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