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Discussion Starter #1
WOW! I have never owned a vehicle where you could feel the difference, and power loss, from riding in a higher altitude as this bike. I live at sea level but stoped by my in-laws on the way home from Texas who live at 2200'. Did some riding there and if I hadn't rode at higher altitudes once before I would have thought something was wrong. I could not get the front wheel off the ground, well not using my current technique anways. Oh well, just wondering if you guys had any similar experiences... Man I'd hate to live in Denver...
 
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Re: High Altitude... (galaxy)

Try living at 7000'.


Cheers,
D
 
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Re: High Altitude... (galaxy)

I live at around 300ft above sea level. I hit the local hills and noticed a difference around 4k ft. Went even higher and noticed it more. I always thought that the Injected models adjusted automatically. I pulled to the side of the road and manually adjusted the PCIII and it helped out quite a bit. If you do alot of high altitude riding, I would suggest getting a PCIII and making a note of your settings so you can tweak it on the side of the road when needed.
 
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Re: High Altitude... (Quac)

My wife and I rode a '05 HD Road King with carbs in Maui to the top of Mt. Haleakala @ 10,000+ feet. If you think that Harley's are sluggish at sea level you should have driven it up there.


The air was so thin at the top of the crater that we saw two people fall flat on the faces while walking
 
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Re: High Altitude... (CaliDuc)

As you go up in altitude, the atmospheric presure sensor tells the ECU to reduce fuel to compensate for reduced air density. Less air plus less fuel equals less power. No Power Commander setting will change that.
 
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Re: High Altitude... (Shazaam!)

Correct me if I am wrong, but doesnt the PC "trick" or "Bypass" the ECU?
 
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Re: High Altitude... (CaliDuc)

Yes, your PC allows you to change the ECU fuel map and correct for any type of fueling needs. My point is only that the power loss you experience at altitude is because you're taking in less air. So the bike now will run rich unless the pressure sensor dials back fuel. Adding more (or less) fuel with a Power Commander won't allow you to regain any lost power. If you did get a performance improvement by fiddling with the PC, your atmospheric pressure sensor is probably defective or your initial low altitude fueling is way off.


Modified by Shazaam! at 11:45 AM 5/17/2005
 
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Re: High Altitude... (Shazaam!)

A PCIII won't fix your altitude sickness, but a turbo normalized powerplant will.
 
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Re: High Altitude... (planejob)

We're at 7600ft in the flats here, and it's nothing to see 10,000+ up on the Mountain passes. FWIW the PC's really help!
 
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Re: High Altitude... (Tornado-rider)

I suppose it could be what one is used to. I ride up and down 5,000 feet all the time. I live at 8,800ft. Can't tell a difference. Just went over 10,000ft. Kenosha Pass yesterday for lunch on the 998 and was howling/booming all the way. Bike dyno'd at 118hp in Denver. Maybe if I took it to sea level I'd tell a difference, but can't tell a thing between 5000 feet (Denver) and 10,000ft.

FWIW, Can't tell a difference with the altitude compensating Harley-Davidson CV carbs either (they are outstanding). Updates those who think EFI is the only high altitude air/fuel solution.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Your greatest change (or rate of change) is between sea level and 5,000'. Above that, the amount of pressure change per 1000' for instance is not as great as per 1000' below 5000'. That would explain why you don't notice as much difference where youo're riding. If you were at sea level you'd know it!!!!
 
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Re: High Altitude... (Shazaam!)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD>Quote, originally posted by Shazaam! »</TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">As you go up in altitude, the atmospheric presure sensor tells the ECU to reduce fuel to compensate for reduced air density. Less air plus less fuel equals less power. No Power Commander setting will change that. </TD></TR></TABLE>

Correct but it depends what bike it is. All Ducatis does not have a correct pressure adjustement correction. If you look at FIM home page it tells a bit.
http://www.fuelinmoto.com.au/ and click FAQ
You can even order a FIM chips with "ducati style" corrector or a fully correcting curve from FIM. I dont know how it is with ducatis ECU 5.9. I would be surpriced if it corrected.

Duane will know for sure...........

Jocke...........
 
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Re: High Altitude... (vij)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD>Quote, originally posted by vij »</TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">All Ducatis does not have a correct pressure adjustement correction.</TD></TR></TABLE>

Good point vij, I had forgotten about that. The atmospheric pressure correction to the fuel map is only half of what it should be (used to be) at 2,600 feet. So if you use a Power Commander to lean fueling further, it'll run better but still at reduced power levels.
 
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