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I like it though I still am not a fan of the Buell front brake system.

+1 me too, they looked like they tried to hard to make the brakes different then everyone else. Some times same is ok......
 

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Very nice. Love the rear subframe and the radiator/air intake treatment.

Does this thing really make anything like 185 RWHP? That is surely the race bike, not the street version?

FWIW, I've always liked the idea of that front brake, eliminating the forces and strength needed for the wheel, and with an overall lightened unsprung mass. It simply needed to be refined to see the potential advantages. Without the refinement/development to make it better in brake feel, and power though, it was simply a potentially good idea, without clear advantage. Hopefully they won't give up on it.

I'd like to see Buell take the concept to the rear wheel, by moving the entire brake assembly inboard of the unsprung mass/suspension assembly. i.e. with a chain or belt or shaft drive out the rear wheel, why on earth not use that system to transfer the light rear wheel braking forces to the rear wheel, with the entire brake sitting on the transmission shaft or swingarm pivot? Zero brake system unsprung mass!
 

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FWIW, I've always liked the idea of that front brake, eliminating the forces and strength needed for the wheel, and with an overall lightened unsprung mass. It simply needed to be refined to see the potential advantages. Without the refinement/development to make it better in brake feel, and power though, it was simply a potentially good idea, without clear advantage. Hopefully they won't give up on it.

I'd like to see Buell take the concept to the rear wheel, by moving the entire brake assembly inboard of the unsprung mass/suspension assembly. i.e. with a chain or belt or shaft drive out the rear wheel, why on earth not use that system to transfer the light rear wheel braking forces to the rear wheel, with the entire brake sitting on the transmission shaft or swingarm pivot? Zero brake system unsprung mass!
The fact being any benefit in unsprang weight is being offset by the increased moment of inertia.

As for the rear wheel - KISS keep it simple. Especialy for racing where the rear disk is of minimum size and accordingly weight and mometom of inertia are kept low due to the low load on the rear during most breaking.

Bottom line if this method had any substantial benefit we would have seen it long ago in MOTOGP/WSBK - we didn't till now and that says it all.



As to the rest of the bike - looks nice especialy the subframe :cool: .
 

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The fact being any benefit in unsprang weight is being offset by the increased moment of inertia.
Possibly, but I'd like to see some measurements for that assumption. Yes, the large single disc has greater MOI than a normal single disc....but the lighter wheel and complete lack of a second disc may well offset that MOI difference - and provide lighter mass for unsprung suspension control, which was the primary reason for the setup.

As for the rear wheel - KISS keep it simple. Especialy for racing where the rear disk is of minimum size and accordingly weight and mometom of inertia are kept low due to the low load on the rear during most breaking.
Too often, innovation is set back by the predominance of what has been done before and the lack of time and funds to fully develop new ideas. Much time and effort is spent on reducing unsprung mass in racing....it's a fairly logical step to try. People pay THOUSANDS to remove 2-3 lbs of unsprung mass. How about a simple 5-10 lbs? Difficult to package? Yes. Maybe insurmountable, but I'd like to see someone try, and who better than Buell, who is never scared to try something different :)

Best of all...this potential innovation and improvement would not take away from the rider's control or role in the overall package.
 

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Yeah, if only we could CAD up some product...

I'm sure my 2000 SV would look nice if we could draw up some product like they did for that Buell and then actually have it made.

Until then, me and my SV 650 with Penske, RaceTech Forks and exhaust will continue to suprise the "unready"; even if we are a bit fuggly...


I'll take one of these though... weired and all; i'm in!!! :rockon
 

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I'm digging it! I heard that he was working on some type of deal with another mfg'r to start something up again? Hopefully he will! :rockon
 

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I remember early ATKs with the countershaft mounted rear brake disc. PITA....


I like the looks of that Buell up there, but even if it is a race bike, it needs a bigger seat pad!


.
 

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baldy, i would question the feel one would get from a brake that depends on a belt or chain to operate. given that you would be moving all the slack from one side of the chain to the other during braking applications you may end up with a grabby or vague feel from the rear.
 

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baldy, i would question the feel one would get from a brake that depends on a belt or chain to operate. given that you would be moving all the slack from one side of the chain to the other during braking applications you may end up with a grabby or vague feel from the rear.
I agree, the chain slack issue would need to be worked out. One alternative is a concentric axis between swingarm and countershaft, as had been done a few times (BMW 450X is the latest I can think of) - this would reduce the amount of chain slack and thus snatch potential, possibly with some kind of spring loaded tensioner to reduce the jerk effect.

For belt and shaft drive applications, this would be much less an issue, due to the reduction in driveline slop compared to a normal chain setup. It would be an interesting exercise to test. My Duc 996 has a terribly heavy caliper and carrier and rotor.....I reckon it is twice as heavy as it needs to be, even in the stock location. If the whole caboodle was moved off the suspension, so much the better.
 

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I hardly knew anything about the Buell prior to Nov of 09. Frankly, I didn't care for them mainly because of the HD antiquated powerplant. As others have said, how can you build a proper sport bike with a Harley Vtwin? That all depends on who is doing the qualifying on that subject, but when Harley dumped Buell I took an interest in what they were selling. I was attracted to the 1125CR right away because it had a sinister look to it and was powered by a respectable Rotax twin, a break from the Harley twins. In the ergos department the seating was more upright and since I was also interested in picking up a naked bike this time around it was like a gift when the last remaining Buells were put on the market with a $5K rebate. I searched the 4 western states for one and at the time they were going quickly. I lucked out and found a 2010 model in Reno, Nevada and made a phone call deal that same day. I pulled my trailer up there to find out it wasn't a 2010 CR model but an 09 instead. I found out the 2010 bikes were rare and offered only a couple of improvements anyway. I told the dealer I wasn't interested but when he said, "if I can come up with a deal that can make you smile, would you buy the 09?" I said "of course". He came back and asked which 09 1125CR I wanted and I told him the one with the raised handlebars. I wanted that option anyway and it was a $500 add on. Anyway, I paid $6,100 for it with the MSRP was over $13K. I loaded the bike up after riding it around the parking lot and drove home. Just the ride around the parking lot impressed me, it was the ease of sitting upright with the handlebars in a position where you could actually steer the bike easily, especially while manuevering slow in tighter spaces.

Since then the bike has been more than what I expected. I dialed the suspension in and took it out after a month of a shake down ride with some buddies to a popular road in Nor Cal called Skaggs Springs Rd. I tested the bike by going in tow behind a buddy on his 998, this being the first time I aggressively road the bike and in fact the first time riding like that since I had a serious accident in 05. I felt a little apprehensive at first, I didn't want to take another helicopter ride, but as we began to pick up speed the bike held the lines with total confidence. I was impressed.

The different front brake feels like anyother set up I've had. I haven't taken it to the track but want to one of these days. The bike is now my miles bike because of its comfort level and if I want to I can hammer it just like I was on my 999R. The power is excellent, with a claimed 146HP to the crank.

I had the pleasure of meeting Erik Buell when myself and three others trailered our bikes down to LA this Summer to attend the ProIalia "Ride the Crest" event. Bike show, sideshows and a 500 bike police escorted ride to Newcombs at the top of the Angeles Crest Trail. It was fantastic, they blocked every intersection enroute to the Trail, even slow blocking traffic on the freeway. We all thought the ride up was going to be slow going and it was very hot out, but that was not the case, it was like a small group ride on a weekend run in the hills. At Newcombs they provided a lunch and rock concert, complete with some top notch rock musicians. What blew me away is the fact that Erik himself is a rocker, he can play lead guitar and sing and hes damn good at it. Very approachable fellow and one on a mission. I wish him the best.
 

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Too often, innovation is set back by the predominance of what has been done before and the lack of time and funds to fully develop new ideas.
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With the Britten in mind, I could not agree more.
I think that we can also say thanks to Erik for the underslung exhaust.

Much time and effort is spent on reducing unsprung mass in racing....it's a fairly logical step to try. People pay THOUSANDS to remove 2-3 lbs of unsprung mass. How about a simple 5-10 lbs? Difficult to package? Yes.
So why don't we see it in MotoGP and WSBK, there are aftermarket kits available.

Maybe insurmountable, but I'd like to see someone try, and who better than Buell, who is never scared to try something different :)

Best of all...this potential innovation and improvement would not take away from the rider's control or role in the overall package.
I don't like innovation just for the sake of innovation in itself at least not in a performance bike.

Though I do appreciate anything that makes the Japanese factorys leave the lights on, I much prefer John Britten's RIP way of thinking than that of Erik Buel's.

Just think of what could have been had Britten lived to bring us his vision in full.



 
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