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chimp on my shoulder
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
:banghead :rtfm
The English words than and then look and sound a lot alike, but they are completely different. If this distinction is harder than it should be, read this lesson and then try again.


Than

Than is a conjunction used in comparisons:

Tom is smarter than Bill.

This is more important than you might think.


Is she taller than you?

Yes, she is taller than I.

Technically, you should use the subject pronoun after than (e.g., I), as opposed to the object pronoun (me). However, English speakers commonly use the object pronoun.


Then

Then has numerous meanings.

1. At that point in time

I wasn't ready then.

Will you be home at noon? I'll call you then.

2. Next, afterward

I went to the store, and then to the bank

Do your homework and then go to bed

3. In addition, also, on top of that

He told me he was leaving, and then that I owed him money

It cost $5,000, and then there's tax too

4. In that case, therefore (often with "if")

If you want to go, then you'll have to finish your homework.

I'm hungry!
Then you should eat.


The Bottom Line

Than is used only in comparisons, so if you're comparing something use than. If not, then you have to use then. What could be easier than that?

taken from this here Than vs Then - e Learn English Language
 

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chimp on my shoulder
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Discussion Starter #4
WTF "WTF"? perhaps this lesson might make it more clear :woot: I'm just bustin' balls 'cause the lack of true a grasp; if you will, around here of the English language amuses me sometimes. Sometimes it just makes me sad for the state of the education system in this country. either way this post makes me chuckle.

taken from:A Versus An : Grammar Girl :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™
Today's topic is a versus an.

A lot of people learned the rule that you put a before words that start with consonants and an before words that start with vowels, but it's actually a bit more complicated than that. For example, here's Matthew with a question:

I've been wondering if it is actually a hour or an hour. An hour sounds more correct, but a hour reads more correct. I'm just curious on what it should be.

The rule is that you use a before words that start with a consonant sound and an before words that start with a vowel sound (1).

Should You Use a or an?

So to answer Matt's question, an hour is correct, because hour starts with a vowel sound. People seem to ask most often about words that start with the letters h and u because sometimes these words start with vowel sounds and sometimes they start with consonant sounds. For example, it is a historic monument* because historic starts with an h sound, but it is an honorable fellow because honorable starts with an o sound. Similarly, it is a Utopian idea, but an unfair world.
 

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TOP GUN Instructor
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5,717 Posts
Come on folks, learn grammar rules. Than you will be smarter then your average speedzilla poster.:)
LMAO... YEP! Leave it up to Capt.Home Slice of Peye OPPs I mean Pie for getting it rite!:woot:


Hey Johnny,... You've GOT to remmmmber Brother.... We have people from ALL over this great big world of ours on SpeedZilla.... It ain't just US USofA Americans You knew, ;)

Peace Jeff..... FWIW... Still LMAO Pie man :woot:

That's right Chris, count me in as a Non-Pussy as far as this or that is concerned..:p LOL
 

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Is your thread title meant as a joke ?:D B/c it reads " forum technology at it is finest ." I think Dezmo beat me to it .
 

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chimp on my shoulder
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Discussion Starter #12
Is your thread title meant as a joke ?:D B/c it reads " forum technology at it is finest ." I think Dezmo beat me to it .
The entire thread is tongue in cheek. I caught that I did that just after posting and said fvck it, maybe it'll get a laugh. I'm not above making mistakes and owning them.
 
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