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Yep;That's right,kids....."The Gap" IS,in fact, cleaned up and NOW back open and ready for peeps entering from the TN. side to ride in! But my "guess" is that LEO will be heavy up there seeing as how SO many have been "itching" to get back up there so just be aware and cautious if you make it up!!!!
 

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I went for my first time in june and from I was hearing some liked it alot better becasue there was no threw traffic and no trucks. There were only 2 LEO's on the day we rode it and they sat closer to the NC/TN line.
 

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I went for my first time in june and from I was hearing some liked it alot better becasue there was no threw traffic and no trucks. There were only 2 LEO's on the day we rode it and they sat closer to the NC/TN line.
I went for the first time in May and feel the same way. The only people on it were there for the ride. No regular daily traffic at all! Which made it feel very comfortable for a first timer!
 

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unificator
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i enjoyed it much more when it was "closed" also... saw NO police and only about 10% of the bikes were cruisers. only had time for a couple runs but didnt have to get around anyone. the best rides ive ever had there! wish it would close more often.
 

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Just curious. Where did the term LEO come from? What's it mean (besides a cop, of course)? Come to think of it, where did cop come from? Are we just repeating things we've heard even though we don't know anything about the meaning?

Deals Gap. Looks awesome but seems like something of a joke it's so crowded and teeming with "Leos". Sort of like Disneyland for cycles.
 

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Shane RC51
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cop - Wiktionary


Best one I could find:

Short for copper (“police officer”), itself from cop (“one who cops”) above, i.e. a criminal. Sometimes explained as deriving from copper buttons or badges of early NYPD or uniforms or on those worn by the first London Police Force of the 1820s, though this is often stated to be a folk etymology. 'Cop' has long existed as a verb meaning "to take or seize"; the first example of 'cop' taking the meaning 'to arrest' appeared in 1844, and the word swiftly moved from simply meaning 'to arrest into police custody' to encompass the individual doing the detaining. (Reference: snopes.com: Cop: Constable on Patrol? Snopes Article )
 

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fast is never fast enough
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The Gap

Was there all last week. The LEO's were in out in force during the weekend. Didn't help that a fellow rider took himself out when he slid into 3 oncoming harley riders. The weekday LEO was light however..best roads i've ever ridden.
 
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