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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a good way to get that nasty hard crap off? The previous owner didn't I know that.
tried a seach already, sorry I didn't find any suggestions.
thanks.
 

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heavyzee said:
Brake cleaner, industrial degreaser, or WD40, all work well
If you use brake cleaner, make sure it's Chlorinated brake cleaner.

Chlorinated brake clean is Trychloethylene.

Most Non-Chlorinated brake cleaner is Acetone. Acetone will harm paint, rubber seals, plastics and anything else that it can eat.

WD40 works well when mixed with elbow grease.
 

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Kerosene. Naturally lifts, cleans, and lubricates rubber o-rings when used on chains. If you have any kerosene sitting around the garage not serving a good purpose, don't hesitate to dampen a rag with it and attack that rear shock. Just be sure to follow up with a clean, dry cloth to remove any left over residue. If you don't use kero this time, then just think about it the next time the chain needs a serious cleaning because I have come to find that kerosene is good for two things: making jet fuel and cleaning/lubricating motorcycle chains:D
 

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Sign of Eth
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I use 100% silicone spray on shock, linkage, to clean my chain, cleans, protects, and lightly lubes in one step, if you can move it lube it.:D
 

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I've used Simple Green Max, you can get it at some autoparts stores like autozone. Its simple green but basically a degreaser. Works well and doesn't eat anything it shouldn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Great, simple green it will be, thanks for all the help. Let the cleaning begin.


Oh, how does it work at ZERO degrees? God I hate Minnesota.
 

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Camel Jockey said:
Great, simple green it will be, thanks for all the help. Let the cleaning begin.


Oh, how does it work at ZERO degrees? God I hate Minnesota.
It ain't zero and and yur' HONDA deserves a good home, Bring it in the house ( eventually SHE will go away ) :twocents

Oh ya, wanna ride Tonka ice :rockon
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry, it was 1 degree when I woke up that morning. Not zero! :)

I thought about the basement, but I'm going to finish the basement starting in about a week, so too much sheetrock dust and crap for me to think it would be safe.
 

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area51racer said:
Kerosene. Naturally lifts, cleans, and lubricates rubber o-rings when used on chains. If you have any kerosene sitting around the garage not serving a good purpose, don't hesitate to dampen a rag with it and attack that rear shock. Just be sure to follow up with a clean, dry cloth to remove any left over residue. If you don't use kero this time, then just think about it the next time the chain needs a serious cleaning because I have come to find that kerosene is good for two things: making jet fuel and cleaning/lubricating motorcycle chains:D
Kerosene is good for cleaning a chain. But it's hell on the tire. Have many marks in front of my house trying to burn the kerosene off the tire. Tire+ Kerosene = slick as ice.

Not sure what it has to do with cleaning the shock, but I thought I'd add my :twocents.
 
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