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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Re: Chain adjustment vid - online (saf)

Great video, learned a few things like loosening the bolt instead of just hammering the rear axle rearwards to tighten the chain.

Nice video editing skills as well
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Using th markings on the side of the swing arm will only give you some level of accuracy. It is not the most accurate method. As you spin the rear wheel you have to make sure the chain meets the sprocket center.
Another very important but often overlooked point is using a torque wrench to tightening the rear axle. Not doing so could cause some major problems.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For 25 years of racing and riding, we have never ran a torque wrench on the rear axle. While people who are new to doing such work may not know how tight it has to be, they can simply tighten it as it is, and feel the torque of what the nut is on right now, then loosen it.

As far as the adjustment marks, its as good as you will get off stock, and certainly more than adequate for any road rider.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That must be your 25 years of racing and riding. Pay a little attention to factory and professional teams and you'll see what they use. The torque values are there for a reason.
Telling people with little experience to do things by feel is not very good advice. That is probably what alot of morons do at the tires shops when they overtight the F#$K out of the luck nuts on your tires - they also do it by feel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Im not sure who you have me confused with, but being a Suz aus racer, and a person who has been in such racing circles of pro's along with setting up bikes for such people , i still stand by my reply. Most of the people i know do too aswell .

Must be a southerm hemisphere thing then i suppose .
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just because you do it and the people you know as well does not mean it is the correct way of doing things. You need to take into cosideration the people that you are giving advice to.
As engineer I also stand by my reply.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Re: (saf)

Like I mentioned in another thread...
There is a chain adjustment aid that uses a lazer. The lazer attaches to the driven sprocket with a magnet (clamp if aluminum sprocket). Another magnet attaches to the drive sprocket. You adjust till the lazer hits the drive magnet. Simple. Haven't seen it in America though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: (andres)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD>Quote, originally posted by andres »</TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Just because you do it and the people you know as well does not mean it is the correct way of doing things. You need to take into cosideration the people that you are giving advice to.
As engineer I also stand by my reply.</TD></TR></TABLE>

Anders, Engineer :) .... i could have guessed. Ok you mention the factory teams and pro racers, would you know why they would use a torque wrench at the highest level ? . I do , lets see if you do too. At the start it says if your unsure, refer to the onwers manual ...... as one of the first things you read. If your unsure , look.

Now here is the next problem. How many people who do their own chains, have a torque wrench ? . 1 in 1000 if that ? . In a perfect world, ......

Anyways, feel free to dissagree. Im fine with that. Saying the markings are so so as an example, i think you need to realise its for the 'common person'. You wont tell a common person they need a $300 snap on wrench to do a chain and have the chassis geometry ploted by laser and etched just to adjust a chain within 2 thou. General people.

They can plainly see that i didnt use a 1/2 drive breaker bar and a 3ft tube extension on it , and jump all over it to get the desired torque .....
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Torque wrench. hahaha....I used one of those stupid things on my water pump and undertorqued it. I'm now leaking at the gasket. So, I will prolly never use a torque wrench. I'm pretty good with a wrench so I have a general feeling of what torque values are. Unless I feel the need to spend $$$ every time I drop one to get it recalibrated. By the time I get it back from the precision shop, my chain would've rusted.

Just put some ass behind it. Just not too much, might get a hernia.

Engineers are different than mechanics.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just a gentle suggestion:
All of you guys should read Carroll Smith's "Nuts, Bolts, Fasteners and Plumbing".
THE definitive work on the subject. Fun, too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Saf,

Look I am not going to get into an argument about who is who and who knows more, the point I am trying to get across is that as proper practice a torque wrench should be use specially when it comes to something as important as the rear wheel. On your video you should emphasize torquing to the correct value using a torque wrench as the recommended method.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: (andres)

I will make a small comment to agree with both SAF and Andre at the same time. Saf is correct in his own description as he has vast experience and and his internal torque wrench is probably better then the majority As Andres states majority of users can not tell the difference in 55 foot pounds to 75 foot pounds.

As far as a Sp2 or any other current Motorcycle rear wheel axle. Factory axles being hollow steel units with large diameter nuts can exert massive compressional loads to the internal spacers, to the point of distortion ultimately failures. Over-torquing an axle bolt can cause very expensive and potentially dangerous damage.


Lastly Saf neglected one very important issue in regards to chain adjustment on the Sp2 must be measured with a proper load on the suspension. With the rider on the bike with a standard stock shock and linkage 30 mm of vertical slack is min. this measurement should be done with the rear wheel on the ground and not on a spool stand as it will not represent the correct geometric loads to the suspension.

Good job on the production of your video I do a bit of video editing and am quite aware of the amount of time you poured into that. It is a fine piece of work. Thank you for the time you spent as well as the bandwidth you are paying for to host it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks SP.

As far as adjustment, yes i know that the furthest point of chain travel is when the centreline of the countershaft and the rear sprocket are even thru the centreline of the pivot on the swingarm, but ive set the chain up allways on my bike on the stand, thats identical to the book and its "on the sidestand" method when sag/preload is on stock levels.
 
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