Speedzilla Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Panigaliscious
Joined
·
9,103 Posts
Very cool. If you had one, I wonder how many time someone would ask you where you got that CF cover for the swingarm? ;)
 

·
Dr. Carbon
Joined
·
2,974 Posts
that thing is a work of art, the weave is so nicely seemed, looks so light and nimble in his hands.

the crash protector is really a good idea but it looks a bit on the skimpy side.
 

·
He with the senior member
Joined
·
5,671 Posts
I'd take the BST version long before the old Dymag version myself (money no issue).....but would NOT spend the money on either, out of my own pocket. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,051 Posts
I have never once read or heard a first hand account of what it is like to ride with a composite swinger. i imagine, like people said, it throws balance off somewhat, and that would need to be addressed for optimal performance, and that it would be pointless to run anything stock with such nice stuff, so with lighter rims, rotors, and brakes, and better stopping, the suspension would need to adjusted as well.

anyone ever ridden something completely set up properly with a composite swinger?

i imagine its quicker, in terms of damping, acceleration, and turning in, lighter feeling, and also easier to lose grip with.

anyone?
 

·
He with the senior member
Joined
·
5,671 Posts
I have never once read or heard a first hand account of what it is like to ride with a composite swinger. i imagine, like people said, it throws balance off somewhat, and that would need to be addressed for optimal performance, and that it would be pointless to run anything stock with such nice stuff, so with lighter rims, rotors, and brakes, and better stopping, the suspension would need to adjusted as well.

anyone ever ridden something completely set up properly with a composite swinger?

i imagine its quicker, in terms of damping, acceleration, and turning in, lighter feeling, and also easier to lose grip with.

anyone?
Well, the main advantage will be in wheel response to bumps - due to lower unsprung mass, allowing the wheel/tire to better follow the bumps/contour of the road surface, and thus adding grip/traction. Less wheel bounce...but requiring different tuning of the suspension.

The main disadvantage, I think, is the difficulty in tuning the arm to provide the required/best lateral flex for bump absorption during full-on cornering lean angles....when the sideways flex of the arm is required to provide a controlled level of bump absorption to help maintain traction on bumps in the corners (the angle of the bike leaned over at 50-65 degrees means the suspension is no longer as effective to absorb the vertical road bumps)

There are lots of computer models for the aluminum and chromoly-steel swingarms for flex etc - obviously much less available for cf arms at this time.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top