Speedzilla Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Denmark
Joined
·
512 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some shorter bolts to mount the brake discs on my new PVM wheels. Either cut down the OEM and not be able to ride for a week, or get some flanged hex from Pro-Bolt.
Any reason not to use flanged hex bolts here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,607 Posts
Non reason why you cannot use normal Allen head bolts on the front discs. Dome headed bolts just look sexier, that's all. ;)
As the rear disc is concerned is all a matter of clearances: if you can find something that fits well and doesn't touch anything when the wheel's spinning why not?

PS: do not cut down the OE bolts. You don't want to know how much they are. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
Flanged hex are fine as long as the head isn't to tall. You should be ok with the size of the bolt you need. Other bolts that will also work are SHCS(socket head cap screw---what someone refered to as an allen head), TSHCS(tapered socket head cap screw--preference of type of OE bolts used on the suzuki and Kawasaki bikes), and even the button head(although they tend to have smaller key holes[unless an oe honda bolt] so if to much torque is put on them the key/socket hole could wallow out more easily than other type bolts...this could happen if one often rides in inclement weather where the bolts would be more suseptable to galling in the rim). Also, button heads can be rounded symetrically rounded or straight slanted from a higher middle down to the outer rim with a rounded edge. Yamaha likes to use those type bolts.
Something to note is that there are lots of bolt retailers all over europe that will sell in small quantities and for much less than Pro-Bolt. If you do a Google search for metric bolts there should be quite a few choices.


Not sure why it would take a week to cut your oem bolts cause one should be able to fixe em up with a hack saw and a spare nut. Just thread the nut all the way to the seat of the head then cut off what you don't need. After cutting you unthread the nut to chase the thread properly as most wont be able to make that perfect cut. So one uses the nut to put the proper thread back in the shaft so it doesn't get cross threaded. A good idea os to take a dremel or some small grinder to the tip of the newly cut bolt and clean up the barb that may be on there. Easiest way to make things go smoothly is to back the nut off the thread about half way then thread it back on to were just the tip of the bolt is sticking even or just a hair past the nut. Hold the nut and bolt in place and take the grinder to lightly clean up the tip were the start of your new thread is. All one needs to do is make it smooth....nothing fancy. After that just back the nut on and off the bolt a few times to make sure there are no issues with threading and that's it.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top