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Shane RC51
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I think I may have just made a mistake. I recently did a pretty thorough going over on the RC. Cleaned, lubed, replaced parts, etc. Among the stuff I tackled was the exhaust. I have a pair of shorty carbon cans that I got from MrGrn a long time ago.

I repacked them, and I had the bright idea to wrap the packing material with aluminum foil. My thought was it would help protect the carbon from discoloring/ blowing out again. Tonight I got the RC all put back together and took her out for her first outing since last year. As long as I've had the cans, the carbon part of them has NEVER been hot, even after riding pretty hard for extended periods of time. When I got off the bike, I reached down to check on the cans, and they were HOT. Really freakin' hot. Is the aluminum foil cooking the cans? Looks like I'm going to have to break them down again and pull the foil out.

What do you guys think?
 

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I have long wondered if lining the inside of the carbon canister with heat reflective tape would do exactly what you were trying to accomplish with the foil.

If the aluminum foil is cooking in there I wonder if that heat tape would do the same or if it would successfully protect the carbon...

Gotta repack my carbon sato can's soon so if you get to the bottom of this make sure to let us know.

Stunna


Well, I think I may have just made a mistake. I recently did a pretty thorough going over on the RC. Cleaned, lubed, replaced parts, etc. Among the stuff I tackled was the exhaust. I have a pair of shorty carbon cans that I got from MrGrn a long time ago.

I repacked them, and I had the bright idea to wrap the packing material with aluminum foil. My thought was it would help protect the carbon from discoloring/ blowing out again. Tonight I got the RC all put back together and took her out for her first outing since last year. As long as I've had the cans, the carbon part of them has NEVER been hot, even after riding pretty hard for extended periods of time. When I got off the bike, I reached down to check on the cans, and they were HOT. Really freakin' hot. Is the aluminum foil cooking the cans? Looks like I'm going to have to break them down again and pull the foil out.

What do you guys think?
 

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foil

Well, I think I may have just made a mistake. I recently did a pretty thorough going over on the RC. Cleaned, lubed, replaced parts, etc. Among the stuff I tackled was the exhaust. I have a pair of shorty carbon cans that I got from MrGrn a long time ago.

I repacked them, and I had the bright idea to wrap the packing material with aluminum foil. My thought was it would help protect the carbon from discoloring/ blowing out again. Tonight I got the RC all put back together and took her out for her first outing since last year. As long as I've had the cans, the carbon part of them has NEVER been hot, even after riding pretty hard for extended periods of time. When I got off the bike, I reached down to check on the cans, and they were HOT. Really freakin' hot. Is the aluminum foil cooking the cans? Looks like I'm going to have to break them down again and pull the foil out.

What do you guys think?
I think the foil is acting like a heat sink,take it out
 

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chimp on my shoulder
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I agree with blackdog, you are providing a direct path for heat conduction to the sleeve. you need a barrier and then an insulation layer. so you would need to wrap the core with glass followed by your layer of foil and then an additional layer of glass to insulate the sleeve from the foil.


or just do it as normal and make sure they are packed properly.
 

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The packing insulates the carbon so it stays cool as you say. The foil as mentioned is trapping the heat against the carbon and failure is going to happen as the resin will break down:(

If the packing insulates the carbon from getting hot then the packing should be doing the same for the foil. The foil isnt magically going to just get hot from being in there.

Carbon fiber itself is a insulator to begin with and a simple sheet of aluminum foil, which is much thinner than the carbon, should not cause it to heat up. Especially if the packing is "insulating" it from heat.


OP are you sure you put enough packing in the cans ?
 

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Aren't these the ones that came with no packing and got burnt up? Suprised you kept em. It's interesting, I know many people use stainless steel wool for exhaust packing, you would think a little aluminum foil in there wouldn't cause harm.
 

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The aluminum foil is a better conductor of heat than the packing material. (That's why they make heat sinks out of it.) As the exhaust heat in the canister builds up the aluminum foil will reach the same temperature and since it's against the canister and has greater surface area that heat will be transfered to the outer carbon fiber shell.
 

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The aluminum foil is a better conductor of heat than the packing material. (That's why they make heat sinks out of it.) As the exhaust heat in the canister builds up the aluminum foil will reach the same temperature and since it's against the canister and has greater surface area that heat will be transfered to the outer carbon fiber shell.

and by his theory if the packing is insulting it then it shouldnt get hot lol
 

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Shane RC51
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, to be fair, I bought these cans before anyone knew anything about them. As far as I know, I'm the only one who's ever had an issue with them. In my case, one of the endcaps wasn't completely sealed, and little bits of packing was being blown out. Once enough was missing, it literally exploded. One new carbon sleeve and some new packing material was all that was needed to fix it. No problems since then.

The packing material I'm using came from Cycle Gear. It's a big sheet about 5/8" thick. Cut it to length and then wrap it around the core (as much as will fit inside the sleeve without really jamming it in there) - a little masking tape to hold it in place - then slide the sleeve on. Only change I made was to wrap the packing mat with aluminum foil before sliding the sleeve on.

Guess it didn't work like I thought it would... :banghead
 

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Well, to be fair, I bought these cans before anyone knew anything about them. As far as I know, I'm the only one who's ever had an issue with them. In my case, one of the endcaps wasn't completely sealed, and little bits of packing was being blown out. Once enough was missing, it literally exploded. One new carbon sleeve and some new packing material was all that was needed to fix it. No problems since then.

The packing material I'm using came from Cycle Gear. It's a big sheet about 5/8" thick. Cut it to length and then wrap it around the core (as much as will fit inside the sleeve without really jamming it in there) - a little masking tape to hold it in place - then slide the sleeve on. Only change I made was to wrap the packing mat with aluminum foil before sliding the sleeve on.

Guess it didn't work like I thought it would... :banghead
also to be fair:D since 2008 i have had 2 total confirmed issues out of a couple hundred mufflers and both of them were tri ovals. there was your leaking packing and then another guys inner core weld rattled loose. I am not happy about the 2 mufflers but in all fairness 2 is not horrible:confused: There are pictures of your can that post daily here and people think if they show it again and again it makes the failure rate worse then it is:rolleyes:

I am sorry again for your issue in 2008 i would have gladly had these back for a repack too if you liked sir

if you need anything please ask i was there for you in 2008 and i am still here in 2012
 

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and by his theory if the packing is insulting it then it shouldnt get hot lol
Well it actually serves 2 purposes. One to try to reduce the heat to the external surfaces, and the second main purpose, to serve as a noise inhibitor for the exiting exhaust gases. The aluminum has a greater surface contact area to the outside of the canister than the packing, this along with the poor insulating qualities of exhaust packing would cause the problem he is explaining. It's not that the packing is insulating. It just does not have the surface area to transfer the heat to the canister that the aluminum will once up to temperature. :D
 

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Well it actually serves 2 purposes. One to try to reduce the heat to the external surfaces, and the second main purpose, to serve as a noise inhibitor for the exiting exhaust gases. The aluminum has a greater surface contact area to the outside of the canister than the packing, this along with the poor insulating qualities of exhaust packing would cause the problem he is explaining. It's not that the packing is insulating. It just does not have the surface area to transfer the heat to the canister that the aluminum will once up to temperature. :D

I understand what it does and how it works.
 

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Shane RC51
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm not sure I could really pack more into it. That's what I was trying to say earlier. I would have to really jam shit in there to fit anymore in. Then I don't know how hard it would be to get the sleeve back on...
 

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Are there other materials people are using to repack? I bought some stuff from McMaster that just doesn't seem to last long at all. After 1 track day, it's frickin' loud again.

Can someone suggest something from the McMaster catalog that will last *forever*?

BTW, I have a Jardine 2-1 full exhaust...

Sorry to thread jack....
 
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