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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a search and couldn't find anything that helped. I think this was discussed on the old site. Can anyone tell me how to adjust the idle speed on my 999S? Do I have to take it to the dealer because of needing a mathesis and/or resetting the TPS? I'm not that smart about all of this but it seems like you should be able to adjust the idle without huge hassles.

The service manual only talks about idle adjustment along with CO adjustment. I turned both by-pass screws an equal number of turns in either direction from original setting and saw no change in idle.:confused:
 

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An idle adjustment physically can be made using the idle screw which is inside the airbox on the back of the throttle linkage. You should also zero out the TPS before doing this. Shoot me a PM I may be able to help you out if your in the Bay Area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I sent you a PM. Does anyone else have a input? Idle speed adjustment used to be such an easy thing to do (frustrated).:banghead
 

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you adjust the idle speed with the air bleeds - wind them out until it's where you want it. then you set the idle mixture using the mathesis, which if it's way off and changes the idle speed can require reseting the air bleeds to suit. then you adjust the air bleeds individually as required around the above settings to balance the mixture in each header. so it'll end up out of balance vacuum wise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
brad black said:
you adjust the idle speed with the air bleeds - wind them out until it's where you want it. then you set the idle mixture using the mathesis, which if it's way off and changes the idle speed can require reseting the air bleeds to suit. then you adjust the air bleeds individually as required around the above settings to balance the mixture in each header. so it'll end up out of balance vacuum wise.
So, me being mechanically challenged, I take your answer to mean that you do need the mathesis. Not something the average guy can just do in his garage.
 

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Wile E. Coyote said:
So, me being mechanically challenged, I take your answer to mean that you do need the mathesis. Not something the average guy can just do in his garage.
Most dealers can't do it right:banghead I'm afraid you may have a tough time with this one, sorry.
 

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Concerning the 5.9M ECU, is there any way to verify TPS "0" without the use of the Mathesis Tester such as checking throttle plate angle with the Technoresearch software or measuring voltage at the TPS connector pins? If so, what would those values be? By the way I'm new to this forum and a new owner of a Ducati.
 

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short answer - no.

long answer - the throttle bodies come set from weber at a certain opening angle. this angle is set at either (allegedly anyway) 1.3 degrees for 749/749S and 2.3 degrees for 749R/all 999. as such there are two part numbers for throttle bodies, 749 ones and 999 ones.

however, it would appear that along the way this got transposed into euro (which we get) and usa, as all the ones we've done (we do a baseline at first service) are around 1.3 degrees. and jason at section8, whos procedure/results prompted our procedure, says theirs seem to all be 2.3. thus we have hassles (in as delivered form) with some 999 - 999S and '05 999 in particular - and he has hassles with 749.

if you hook into the tps itself you can read the mv at idle and fully closed. these linear tps no longer use the 150mv base setting of all the older tps, they are just open a certain amount. for a 749, 1.3 degrees is 65mv. for a 999 or 749R, 2.3 degrees is 100mv. the actual voltages are not important.

so, the procedure for that is:

1/ shut the throttle all the way (idle stop all the way out, slack in fast idle cable, etc)

2/ measure the voltage at fully closed

3/ wind the idle stop up to give the specified amount as per above

then you'll have your throttle set at the right opening for you model. of course, you now need the mathesis to go any further. the next step is the tps reset, a referencing step (and it is this step that needs to be done when you fit a new ecu) which tells the ecu that the voltage coming out of the tps now is the idle voltage and thus idle degree setting for this bike. the ecu has the value in its software, so if it's a 999 ecu it will say "rightyho then, XXXmv = 2.3 degrees. sorted". and off it goes happily.

if you don't do this step the ecu has no real idea where the tps is, and you can get some low speed issues - i've seen new ecu give readings of 0 degrees to 6 degrees as fitted before this reset is done. the only way to do this is with the mathesis or the technoresearch (i think it does it) or FIM software.

once you've done that you can do the idle speed, balance, mixture, etc.

the other way to do the zeroing is to use the tps reset function - close the throttle all the way, carry out reset. wind the idle stop in to give the appropriate degrees increase - add 1.3 or 2.3 then carry out another tps reset and you're done. requiring the mathesis, etc. no other way afaik or that they'd tell us.

however, that should be no reason for some of you to not take the info i've given and apply it to your bike without the right gear and fuck it up.

hope that helps.
 

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The reason I tried prying this information from you is that so many of the dealers here in the US have a 19 yr. old tech fresh out of school and with no experience with Ducati. The ones that do have an experienced tech either give you the idiot treatment or simply don't have a clue. When I go in and ask to have my fuel injection "blue printed", I at least want to be informed as to what the proceedure is and to be assured the tech and I are on the same page. In the 45 yrs. I've been riding and wrenching motorcycles, I don't think I've ever been so frustrated in my dealing with Ducati service departments. Brad, I sincerely appreciate and thank you for your straight forward information and advice. I currently own a new 1000S DS Multistrada that I hope to own for a long time as soon as I work out a few issues with the FI. Thanks again!
 
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