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TOP GUN Instructor
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Worth an update to this old thread as I added #2 on my hypothetical list (post #13 above) a few days ago. She needs love for sure.

Cannot believe how quiet the stock exhaust is though. Parts are possibly even more difficult to find than for my 851 or old Mille. But then I wouldn't know what to do if I had a 2011 GSXR1000 where every company made stuff for it....

SWEET! Congrads sburns!

Your #2 is>
My #1)> I've got an 85 as well, but I've installed the IMO Much Cooler 86 Twin Head light set-up in mine and tossed the Comstars as
(I HATE those rims) and installed the 17" rims from a CBR!:D
Worked\Customized my rear shock, made it adjustable read made longer.;)

Enjoy her, they're jems, once you get a few tweaks done to them.
 

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Hi Guys,
Greetings from Malaysia. I am thinking of getting a 97' 750F. Am wondering on the following and will sincerely much appreciate any advice you can spare on conversion to 800 VTEC especially for the rear.

a) are the fuel tanks and body frame the same for these 2 models?
b) roughly how much does it cost for the 800 vtec full seat, pillion seat cover, seat cowls? Are they easily available in the states?
c) what level of difficulty to make the 800 Vtec ( 6th Gen ) conversion for the rear ?

I just love what fotomoto has done but i still cant figure if his is a 97'750F ?

Thanks so very much in Advance guys....and Happy Riding !!
 

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I like the yellow one!!!
I have this same bike, but kept with the original position of my aftermarket exhaust can...
which keeps the weight lower, doesnt destroy my soft luggage and never scrapes the ground,
even when the side of my boot does.
If people can't see me on this bike, they shouldn't be driving!
Oh, and if anyone thinks the 5th gen is 'boring', a slip on is the only mod I did.
The stock mapping works perfectly now, and the front end goes skyward without any clutch work or body english;
and MAN does it sound great!
0ver 50,000 miles (lots of them are punishing) and valves are still in spec!
My girlfriend has been on the back of many of my bikes and calls this one
"The Cadillac of CrotchRockets"
 

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It depends on what you need the bike for.
For commuting and long range touring the 800 FI is the best bet. Engine wise it's completely superior to the later VTEC: it's more reliable, better put together, less temperamental, less sensitive to fuel quality, gear driven train lasts forever etc. If you have the choice get a later bike: Honda addressed the two main weaknesses of the bike starting in 2000 by fitting stainless steel headers (previous mild steel unit rotted away pretty quickly) and Shingenden R/R (don't know what Honda used before but it was nicknamed "rectumfrier" for obvious reasons).

The 750 is a better bet if you want a jack of all trades, able to handle some commuting, some touring and some fun around the twisties. Also no fuel injection and simple electronics mean you can service it in your garage no problem.
EVERY VFR that I've owned burned up at least one R/R. But then again, so have both of my Kawi Ninjas, too.
Fortunately, now days inexpensive replacements are available. So I keep a spare under the seat of any bike I plan to leave my neighborhood on. They are the easiest plug and play repair possible if you are troubleshooting.
 

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The 5gen is a great bike but I could never get past the bland (IMO) styling. I stuck with the 4gen and skipped the 5gen while waiting for the 6gen. In fact, I've owned two of each of those generations over the years. Here's a pic of the one time I actually owned a "stable". OK, it was only for about a month but....





The 4gen is a much easier bike to work on; no FI or linked brakes. Carbs aren't THAT hard to service if you know the tips. The 4gen also responds very well and very easily to cheap, yet effective mods. A $250 F4i front end will transform the handling. Tons of mods to my second one (96):




But my first one (94), stayed true to the cause.





Both generations were great day long warriors as I'm very sure the 5gen is too.
On the fence about these two bikes. It seems the 800 functionally would be superior (more power, fuel injection). But the 750 just looks so darn cool, like a poor man's NR750. 800 can also be had in tasty yellow.

Both are about $3000 today. The older bike maybe a little less but not enough to make a difference.

Anyway, for those that have owned/ridden both, opinions?
On the fence about these two bikes. It seems the 800 functionally would be superior (more power, fuel injection). But the 750 just looks so darn cool, like a poor man's NR750. 800 can also be had in tasty yellow.

Both are about $3000 today. The older bike maybe a little less but not enough to make a difference.

Anyway, for those that have owned/ridden both, opinions?
If you ask me, there are no bad VFR's. They are ALL great bikes!
But my Y2K 800fi (5th gen) is hands down the best thing I've ever done for my motor pool!
That being said, I haven't had a 4th gen or anything later than 5th. Only 1st, 2nd and 5th.
EVERY VFR that I've owned burned up at least one R/R. But then again, so have both of my Kawi Ninjas, too.
Fortunately, now days inexpensive replacements are available. So I keep a spare under the seat of any bike I plan to leave my neighborhood on. They plug and play easier than swapping a battery.
I didn't like the linked brakes, not one bit, at first. But now I feel like other bikes / riders are loosing out.
That's just personal preference, after getting acquainted. But either way, nobody should consider the linked brake system a problem, because it's easily conventionalized by running straight lines.
Furthermore, this has been one of the most mechanic friendly bikes I've ever tinkered with (especially when compared to other plastic wrapped sport bikes). Not to mention, the only work it will ever need is maintaining basic wear items like breaks and tires. I've got over 50,000 miles on my original clutch (and I don't take it easy on it) and the typical valve train maintenance associated with most Jap bikes has been historically nullified with the gear driven system.
Some people put 'high pipes' on there's but I kept with the original position for my aftermarket slip on...
which keeps the weight lower, doesnt destroy my soft luggage and never scrapes the ground,
even when the side of my boot does.
I didn't choose my color. Yellow was all that was available when I got it. If people can't see me on this bike, they shouldn't be driving!
Oh, and if anyone thinks the 5th gen is 'boring', the slip on is the only performance mod I have.
The stock mapping works perfectly now, and in first gear the front end goes skyward without any clutch work or body english. Second gear just requires a good tug at the right time..
and MAN does it sound great!
It's definitely more power than the 750's I've ridden (which were obviously stronger than the 700's I've owned, not to mention the super fun 500's), and it beats any of the carbureted 900's I've come across, too.
Off the line, it gets moving quicker than my buddies old VFR 1000, but he pulls his gears a little longer (all be it, slower revving to a lower redline). So during 2nd gear roll-ons, he manages to keep up with me through 4th. After that, he is stretching out his final gear (5th) and I'm still pulling pretty hard (with a higher redline) with 2 more gears. If we come into any corners, it's no contest at all. My 800 corners more confidently than many sport bikes I've owned or ridden. It feels way lighter than it is and although the suspension is very plush, it tracks and travels very very well, in stock trim.
Aside from the riding position (which was less 'fetal' in the earlier models), that's probably the biggest defecit between an older bike and a newer bike. Like my 1985 Interceptor 700, for instance, felt harsh and a bit sketchy, in comparison. But I could still corner at 80mph with average Joe's that were riding 20 year newer bikes. It just wasn't as smooth going over rail road tracks and such. My 1988 model was much nicer to ride than my 85, but nowhere near as nice as my 5th gen Y2K model. So I would hope that the even newer models would ride even better! But on the other hand, I don't care because I'm quite content with what I have and I'm not looking for any reasons to change that.
My girlfriend has been on the back of many of my bikes and calls this one
"The Cadillac of CrotchRockets"

(Note: I still think my zx9 is more comfortable, and I prefer it for taking a passenger. But an after market seat will hopefully some day change that. Then, I'll probably just wonder why I didn't drop the big bucks sooner.
I like the way my 5th gen feels in corners, WAY more than my Ninja. But I want to preserve it. So I got an R6 for track days. I won't cry if I wad that one up and I can always find another track bike. But I don't see too many Interceptors for sale. People tend to keep them, or regret letting them go.)
 
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